Following up on corruption

6 01 2010

A reader has suggested that we follow these stories on corruption and the Abhisit Vejjajiva government and tha capacity for corruption allegations to destabilize the coalition, especially as the Deputy Health Minister holds out on resignation over the Thai Khemkaeng projects. Our reader suggests beginning with this interesting editorial in The Nation
http://www.nationmultimedia.com/2010/01/02/opinion/opinion_30119583.php

He them suggests looking at General Pathomphong Kasornsuk’s letter to Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva to urge him to set up a committee to investigate the army’s procurement scheme for GT200 bomb detectors, and the surveillance airship being used in the South:
http://www.thailandoutlook.tv/tan/ViewData.aspx?DataID=1023045

Then see this claim by a contractor for the Thai Khemkaeng stimulus package of 20 % kickbacks to politicians in return for the Transport Ministry’s construction projects:
http://www.nationmultimedia.com/2009/12/30/business/business_30119468.php

Interesting how many of these reports are surfacing. It seems that the only corruption now “missing” from the growing list relates to the Office for Sufficiency Economy Community Projects. It is also interesting that many of these allegations are initially being raised through the Peua Thai Party.



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6 responses

4 04 2012
The politics of censorship « Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] A little on the film and its background may also be of interest for readers. As Manit points out, this was the “last film to receive financial support from the Ministry of Culture’s film fund…” That fund was controversial, with the government doling out money to royalist and royal film makers. Shakespeare Must Die’s credits in the trailer (linked above), also indicate that the making of the film was  supported by the Thai khemkaeng project, also established by the Abhisit government and highly controversial. […]

4 04 2012
The politics of censorship « Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] A little on the film and its background may also be of interest for readers. As Manit points out, this was the “last film to receive financial support from the Ministry of Culture’s film fund…” That fund was controversial, with the government doling out money to royalist and royal film makers. Shakespeare Must Die’s credits in the trailer (linked above), also indicate that the making of the film was  supported by the Thai khemkaeng project, also established by the Abhisit government and highly controversial. […]

25 01 2013
Yellow fear? Or yellow fear campaign? « Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] It is remarkable that Manit declares, like Korn Chatikavanij, a “police state” or a “land gripped by fear” but fails to mention the mas arrests and killing of protesters in 2010 under the Abhisit Vejjajiva regime, which, perhaps not coincidentally funded the banned film, being the “last film to receive financial support from the Ministry of Culture’s film fund…” That fund was controversial, with the government doling out money to royalist and royal film makers. Shakespeare Must Die’s credits also indicated that the making of the film was  supported by the Thai khemkaeng project, also established by the Abhisit government and highly controversial. […]

25 01 2013
Yellow fear? Or yellow fear campaign? « Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] It is remarkable that Manit declares, like Korn Chatikavanij, a “police state” or a “land gripped by fear” but fails to mention the mas arrests and killing of protesters in 2010 under the Abhisit Vejjajiva regime, which, perhaps not coincidentally funded the banned film, being the “last film to receive financial support from the Ministry of Culture’s film fund…” That fund was controversial, with the government doling out money to royalist and royal film makers. Shakespeare Must Die’s credits also indicated that the making of the film was  supported by the Thai khemkaeng project, also established by the Abhisit government and highly controversial. […]

30 08 2018
Fearful, covering up or just thick? | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] reached the maximum, this story goes back beyond the early days of this blog. Our first post was in early January 2010, when General Pathomphong Kasornsuk reportedly wrote a letter to then Prime Minister Abhisit […]

30 08 2018
Fearful, covering up or just thick? | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] reached the maximum, this story goes back beyond the early days of this blog. Our first post was in early January 2010, when General Pathomphong Kasornsuk reportedly wrote a letter to then Prime Minister Abhisit […]