Saudi gems appear from nowhere

6 01 2011

Readers may remember a couple of posts PPT had last year on the resurgence of interest in the so-called Saudi gems and murders saga. Those posts are here, here and here.

We urge readers to go back to those posts and this story for a perspective on the sudden announcement, carried in the Bangkok Post that the Department of Special Investigation “has found five more items of jewellery believed to have been stolen from the Saudi Arabian royal family in 1989 by a Thai worker. The DSI did not disclose where its officials recovered the missing jewellery.”

Another mystery associated with the DSI!? A DSI official added to this by calling on “anyone in possession of the stolen jewellery to return it to the DSI and not to worry about legal action being taken against them because the statute of limitations in the case had expired.” In other words, give them back after 22 years and tehre will not be any charges. But what of the alleged murders, said to be “[f]ive serving and former police…”?

One rumor is that the suddenly appearing jewels might include the massive blue diamond, long rumored to have been with a very high and influential family. We wonder?


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11 03 2011
The curse of the blue diamond | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] For earlier PPT posts on the case, see here, here and here. […]

29 01 2019
Monarchies, a refugee and erasing human rights II | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] Or is it that this case requires monarchy to monarchy decision-making? Social media has been pointed in discussing the differences between Hakeem, considered a political agitator and opposed to Bahrain’s monarchy, and the case of Rahaf Mohammed al-Qunun, who was quickly processed and moved on from Bangkok. Of course, monarchy-monarchy relations with Saudi Arabia have long been poor. […]

29 01 2019
Monarchies, a refugee and erasing human rights II | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] Or is it that this case requires monarchy to monarchy decision-making? Social media has been pointed in discussing the differences between Hakeem, considered a political agitator and opposed to Bahrain’s monarchy, and the case of Rahaf Mohammed al-Qunun, who was quickly processed and moved on from Bangkok. Of course, monarchy-monarchy relations with Saudi Arabia have long been poor. […]




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