Red shirt leaders bailed

22 02 2011

In line with the recent post at PPT regarding the bail application by the jailed red shirt leaders, both the Bangkok Post and The Nation report that their applications were successful.

The Post states that the Criminal Court allowed bail for seven United Front for Democracy against Dictatorship leaders on charges of “terrorism” and their lawyer was seeking additional action on charges against 4 of them and another red dhirt:

Lawyer Winyat Chartmontri said one of the applications was for the release of Natthawut Saikua, Weng Tojirakarn and Wiphuthalaeng Pattanaphumthai who are defendants in a case in which they are accused of leading red-shirt protesters to lay siege to the residence of Privy Council president Prem Tinsulanonda in 2007.

The other is for the release of Yossawaris Chuklom, or Jeng Dokchik, accused of lese majeste and firearms theft.

The court was considering the additional requests.

The Nation adds that: “Each, except Yoswarit, put between Bt600,000 to Bt800,000 as guarantee for the temporary release. The bail approval followed the Monday’s hearing. Yoswarit needed to put Bt1.6 million as a guarantee because he is also facing a lese majesty charge.”

Unfortunately, this release on bail, 10 months after their arrest, comes in the midst of double standards on yellow shirts charged with similar crimes, a deepening lese majeste-based repression and leave more than 100 other red shirts still in jail.

On the yellow shirts, as is the pattern, their leadership showed up at a police station to acknowledge charges against them related to the Internal Security Act, and walked out to a press conference vowing to bring legal cases against those who charged them.


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6 03 2011
Kasit at the U.N. Human Rights Council | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] courts that are politically biased (see here, here and here). While the regime recently released seven red shirt leaders on bail after X months incarcerated, other remain imprisoned and refused bail. An unknown number – […]




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