Silencing red shirts

31 07 2012

The Constitutional Court is continuing its efforts to silence red shirt and other opposition criticism. In a recent post we noted that the Constitutional Court was seeking to do this, and it has now lodged complaints against more than 80 red shirts and opposition politicians! That’s EIGHTY!

In addition, at The Nation, it is reported that the Criminal Court found Puea Thai Party spokesman Prompong Nopparit and his co-defendant Kiatudom Menasahwat “guilty of libel and handed down a one-year jail term suspended for two years due to their first offence” and a fine for “omitting to verify the information before holding a press conference to attack Constitution Court president Wasan Soypisudh on June 3, 2010.”

It is stated that the court “said the pair had maliciously and falsely portrayed Wasan for lacking impartiality.”

To be honest, we are not aware of exactly what the pair said about Wasan. However, we are sure that the judge is not impartial. PPT has numerous posts that speak to the corrupt and biased activities of this most politicized of Thai courts. We won’t repeat it all here as there is just too much, including video evidence of corruption and consideration of verdicts with others. It seems the royalist judiciary is sticking together.

Prompong said he would appeal the verdict.


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22 08 2012
With 4 updates: The trinity that may not be criticized « Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] 4: Readers will recall that, as part of the Constitutional Court’s efforts to stifle criticism of its politicized decision-making, it enlisted the Criminal Court in an effort to revoke the bail […]

22 08 2012
With 4 updates: The trinity that may not be criticized « Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] 4: Readers will recall that, as part of the Constitutional Court’s efforts to stifle criticism of its politicized decision-making, it enlisted the Criminal Court in an effort to revoke the bail […]

22 08 2012
With 5 updates: The trinity that may not be criticized « Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] 4: Readers will recall that, as part of the Constitutional Court’s efforts to stifle criticism of its politicized decision-making, it enlisted the Criminal Court in an effort to revoke the bail […]