Amnesty and red shirts

30 01 2013

Red shirt protesters led by Suda Rangkupan have recently protested the lese majeste sentencing of Somyos Prueksakasemsuk. Now this group has pressured the government on an amnesty for all political prisoners.

The Bangkok Post reports that the government “averted a protracted protest by a red shirt-affiliated group by agreeing to consider an amnesty for political offenders.”

A report in The Nation observes that the group stated that:

… the ruling politicians and red-shirt leadership had made no sincere effort to “return justice to the political prisoners, although the power that you gained directly resulted from the fight of the red-shirt people”. They also urged the government to pass the constitutional amendment proposed by the Nitirat group of academics that is said to offer a general amnesty to settle the political conflict.

After refusing to let Deputy Prime Minister Chalerm Yubamrung off the hook and refused to accept his golden tongue blarney, the group managed to get the government to agree to process the amnesty.

While Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra prevaricated and set out a bureaucratic procedure for the consideration  of amnesty that may eventually sink it, that some red shirts have decided to pressure the government is significant.

That the official UDD is also promoting amnesty suggests that blarney and prevarication may not be a useful long-term political strategy for much longer. Amnesty may at last be on the agenda for political prisoners.


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31 01 2013
Somyos, amnesty and lese majeste « Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] more positive reaction has been for the mobilization of protests demanding amnesty and for Article 112 to be abolished or reformed. Even some usually critical of anything considered […]

31 01 2013
Somyos, amnesty and lese majeste « Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] more positive reaction has been for the mobilization of protests demanding amnesty and for Article 112 to be abolished or reformed. Even some usually critical of anything considered […]




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