Politics, growth and phones

28 06 2013

In a PPT post about a week ago, we commented on a story about how politics and public policies had driven economic growth in the Northeast of the country. A reader has sent us a complementary story from the tech blog memeburn, about the growing use of smartphones.

Thailand already has about 120% mobile phone coverage – more than one phone per person – with most of these being “feature phones.” Now the country is transitioning rapidly to smartphones. Now, two-fifths of phones sold are smartphones. In 2012 that meant more than US$800 million on spent on smartphones.smartphones

The fastest growth for smartphones is in the Northeast. Analysts say that:

… the establishment of new industrial estates after the heavy flooding of 2011 has attracted the labor force back to northeast, fuelling higher demand in this case, for smartphones, since mid of 2012.

The report adds that for many in the Northeast, “their first Google search, Facebook status, or Skype call would be on a smartphone…”. That may have political impacts.

Of course, as our earlier post explained, it is not just floods that have impacted. Politics has played a significant role. The so-called populist policies implemented by the Yingluck Shinawatra government are having a dramatic impact in the Northeast. That will certainly impact politics.


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2 07 2013
Inequality and the rich | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] past couple of weeks, PPT has posted several stories related to inequality, growth and politics (here, here and […]

2 07 2013
Inequality and the rich | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] past couple of weeks, PPT has posted several stories related to inequality, growth and politics (here, here and […]

6 07 2013
Rich, rich, rich II | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] posts we have had on inequality and politically-generated growth in the Northeast (see here and here).  Forbes has a brief story about […]

6 07 2013
Rich, rich, rich II | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] posts we have had on inequality and politically-generated growth in the Northeast (see here and here).  Forbes has a brief story about […]




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