Tainted judge going

17 07 2013

In an important yet brief report, The Nation explains that Constitutional Court president Wasan Soypisudh is resigning “as both president and judge from August 1.” In resigning, Wasan said:

his resignation was in accordance with an agreement by judges when he was elected as president – that he would stay in the post for not more than two years to complete some goals to manage the administration system and finish some cases.

He says he has now completed all his work.

Wasan has been a politicized judge at the head of a politicized court. PPT has had several posts on his activities. In earlier posts, PPT noted that the Constitutional Court is irretrievably biased in favor of the royalist elite. We have shown that this court is corrupt and only too happy to collude with members of that elite, including in the palace. The Constitutional Court has repeatedly acted the judicial arm of the royalist elite, most notably in its actions to dissolved various pro-Thaksin Shinawatra parties and politicians and in its protection of favored parties and groups. Its actions to stymie legal constitutional change have been some of the most biased and ludicrous cases ever seen in Thailand.

The court’s politicized decision-making has been central to the political conflicts of the past decade and Wasan has even stated the biases of the court:

WasanAt a seminar on the court’s role in keeping the balance in Thai politics, he referred to the court’s resolution to dissolve the People Power, Chart Thai and Matchima Thipataya parties [the 2008 judicial coup]. If various groups had not staged so many rallies at the time, the decision might have been different, he said. “If the country at that time had been peaceful, the government and the opposition could have joined hands, the country could have moved forward, and I believe most of the judges would have decided not to dissolve the parties,” he said. “But the country at that time was chaotic and the Constitution Court had to use its judgement to maintain law and order,” he said, adding however that the court was under no pressure.

To the very end, Wasan was acting politically, telling reporters that he delayed his resignation due to “the court was being pressured by the red shirts.” The Bangkok Post notes that the Court did not wish to be seen to be “caving in to pressure from the protesters.”

The resignation of a judge who has presided over the politicization of the Constitutional Court should be cause for some relief, tempered by the knowledge that the Constitutional Court judges have a nine-year term that began in May 2008.


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17 07 2013
White Paper on the politicized judiciary | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] pointed to the politicized activism of some elements of the judiciary. In fact, only yesterday, we noted the impending departure from the Constitutional Court of its President Wasan Soypisudh. That post included several links […]

18 07 2013
White Paper on the politicized judiciary | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] pointed to the politicized activism of some elements of the judiciary. In fact, only yesterday, we noted the impending departure from the Constitutional Court of its President Wasan Soypisudh. That post included several links […]

21 07 2013
More on tainted judge | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] royalist judge and Constitutional Court President Wasan Soypisudh. It adds a little background to our earlier post and confirms Wasan’s role as a political […]

21 07 2013
More on tainted judge | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] royalist judge and Constitutional Court President Wasan Soypisudh. It adds a little background to our earlier post and confirms Wasan’s role as a political […]

6 11 2013
Partisan judges | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] 63 judges have shown that they are pleased and proud to be partisan. We doubt that these royalist flunkies even understand the gravity of the situation they have created by being seen as partisan political […]

6 11 2013
Partisan judges | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] 63 judges have shown that they are pleased and proud to be partisan. We doubt that these royalist flunkies even understand the gravity of the situation they have created by being seen as partisan political […]




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