Abhisit’s fabrications

20 08 2013

The Bangkok Post has a review of Abhisit Vejjajiva’s The Simple Truth, a translation of his Thai-language book from several months ago. This account comes with a foreword by Abhisit’s  school chum Korn Chatikavanij. The review is by Chris Baker, a well-known writer based in Bangkok.

Baker is rather kind to Abhisit’s personal plea for understanding on how it was that he ordered security forces to shoot down protesters in 2010. Or, as Abhisit prefers, apparently living in a fantasy world:

Abhisit explains that he wrote this memoir because red shirts have made political capital by claiming that government forces killed protesters in a brutal crackdown, so he needs to set the record straight: “We have heard plenty of lies _ I now ask for the opportunity to tell the truth.”

The former and now tainted premier apparently takes politics very personally, emphasizing red shirt attacks on himself.

The good old days at the Army Club

The good old days at the Army Club

Abhisit seems to believe that the red shirts “realised that to create even greater chaos, they had to add weapons”. He says that from the end of 2009 demonstrations, the red shirts were “preparing to wage a war.”

Regarding the 10 April 2010, events, Abhisit refers to “black shirts kill soldiers at Kok Wua intersection.” Forget the protesters who were cut down by snipers, for Abhisit and his ilk didn’t care. Abhisit is said to have cried “all night over the incident” but he doesn’t cry for the protesters cut down by military bullets.

The “truth” for Abhisit – and who knows if he believes it or is simply delusional – is that “there were armed guerrillas within the red-shirt movement.” For him, the red shirts were “waging guerilla warfare complete with organised terrorism”, and “wanted the country to become a failed state”. Abhisit seems to repeatedly speak of guerrillas, the men in black, and seldom about red shirts or their issues.

His supporters will believe this “truth,” but the evidence is of something else. As Baker points out:

Someone who read this book with no prior knowledge of the 2010 events would imagine the army suffered heavy casualties from weeks of “terrorism”, “vicious attacks”, and “bullets flying everywhere”. In truth, military casualties did not reach double figures, and deaths of protesters were 10 times as many. Among the many illustrations in the book, several show red shirts holding crude weapons, but there is not a single picture of a soldier visibly holding a gun.

Abhisit apparently believes that the delicate, reluctant military were subjected to “vicious attacks.” He cannot believe or admit to the Army doing anything aggressive or murderous:

As for the killings at Wat Pathum, Abhisit claims it is “unfair and illogical… downright preposterous” to blame them on soldiers. Although the temple had been designated a safe haven for women and children, male protesters had also entered the temple “perhaps even with arms and other weapons”. Abhisit suggests the deaths in the temple were caused by the same “armed militia”, meaning the black shirts. By a mixture of strange logic, innuendo, and unsubstantiated assertion, Abhisit absolves the military of any guilt.

This, apparently, is Abhisit’s “truth.”

His delusional musings – yes, we know we have used the term already, but synonyms are few for this stuff – include this: “I saw everything that happened, and I can confidently say that the true murderers were the same people who had earlier unleashed terror on our city.”

As Baker says:”But of course he did not see everything.”

And, it seems, Abhisit simply hates red shirts and most especially Thaksin Shinawatra. So much does he seem to hate Thaksin that he was prepared to kill and maim thousands. This view may reflect Abhisit’s thinking, but if it does, Abhisit deludes himself, for his assigned role was to protect the existing royalist order at any cost.

He continues to do this in opposition and in arranging street protests against the pro-Thaksin government that he and other royalists see as a mortal threat to their wealth and power.


Actions

Information

4 responses

31 08 2013
The incapacity for self-reflection | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] has now had a chance to read English-language version of former premier Abhisit Vejjajiva’s The Simple Truth, which is a translation of his Thai-language book from several months ago. This account comes with […]

31 08 2013
The incapacity for self-reflection | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] has now had a chance to read English-language version of former premier Abhisit Vejjajiva’s The Simple Truth, which is a translation of his Thai-language book from several months ago. This account comes with […]

6 02 2017
The political story of men in black | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] given the number of reporters covering events, the rewards offered and the military and the Abhisit Vejjajiva regime claiming there were perhaps dozens and maybe hundreds of men in […]

6 02 2017
The political story of men in black | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] given the number of reporters covering events, the rewards offered and the military and the Abhisit Vejjajiva regime claiming there were perhaps dozens and maybe hundreds of men in […]




%d bloggers like this: