With 3 updates: Some reactions to the verdict

9 05 2014

A Wall Street Journal editorial:

Thailand’s Aristocratic Dead-Enders
The royalists who can’t win an election stage a judicial coup.

Royalist forces struck another blow against Thai democracy Wednesday when the country’s Constitutional Court staged a judicial coup and removed Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra from office. Her supposed crime: having impure motives when she transferred a bureaucrat three years ago. For the third time in a decade, this unaccountable institution controlled by the aristocracy has removed an elected leader for dubious reasons.

The justices’ meddling rewards the bad behavior of the ironically named royalist Democrat Party. It boycotted the general election in February after several of its leaders led street protests aimed at overthrowing democracy and installing a ruling council made up of the country’s elite….

The Constitutional Court’s decision this week is a last gasp of the old regime, discrediting itself as it fights to hold back the forces of democracy. One can hope that a wiser leader will emerge from the royalist camp who will realize this and stop trying to overthrow democracy…. For now, though, it appears the aristocracy is not ready to give up its claim to a divine right to rule Thailand and accept the more modest role of loyal opposition.

Academic Paul Chambers:

“This court has a tradition for making ridiculous decisions…. Thailand has become a juristocracy.”Chambers - Copy

Chambers at Khaosod:

“I think once again we have a judicial coup in Thailand,” …

“Thailand has a form of democracy [sic.], but there is no real balance or checks…. What we have here is juristocracy – the judicial branch is head and heels above the legislative and executive branches of the government, and it’s supported by traditional institutions.”

… “This constant replay of courts issuing ridiculous verdicts may cause people who have believed in Thailand’s democracy to stop believing in it,” said Professor Chambers.

Chiang Mai University law lecturer Somchai Preechasilpakul:Somchai - Copy

“The verdict appears to indicate that all Prime Ministers who do not come from the Democrat Party will be eventually removed by the so-called independent agencies…”.

Professor Kevin Hewison at The Conversation:

Because the country’s judiciary is so highly politicised, decisions that defy legal logic have become the norm, with the judiciary consistently acting against elected governments. In essence, such decisions, sometimes based on flimsy accusations and charges by opposition activists, undermine the very democratic processes the judiciary is supposed to protect.

There was never any doubt that the Constitutional Court would oust Yingluck once the case was referred to it. Indeed, the court reached its decision – which took almost two hours to read – within a day of hearing the last of Yingluck’s evidence and witnesses. That is evidence enough that the court had its verdict before hearings were concluded.Hewison - Copy

Such obvious political bias also suggests an orchestration with those opposed to the government. The decision will reinforce views among the government’s supporters that Thailand’s political system is inherently supportive of the royalist elite. They see this elite as not just opposed to the will of the majority as expressed in elections but also as manipulating law and politics to protect their economic and political power.

South China Morning Post:

Ultimately undone by Thailand’s courts, Yingluck Shinawatra laboured under claims she was a stooge for her exiled brother. Yet the kingdom’s first female prime minister also displayed unexpected resilience during a turbulent stay in office….Montesano - Copy

“History will give Yingluck great credit for her conduct since November,” said Dr Michael Montesano at the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore.

“She has scrupulously avoided the use of state violence … maintained the dignity of her office and displayed humanity rather than arrogance while under great pressure.”

Update 1: Duncan McCargo at FT:

The conflict is pitting an entrenched elite that is destined to lose power against new political forces whose rise seems inexorable. Ousting Ms Yingluck on a technicality was an act of desperation, not a show of strength.

Update 2: A Coup by Another Name in Thailand By The Editorial Board of The New York Times:

It was the third time the justices have removed the head of the government in recent years using dubious legal reasoning…. Thailand, which has managed to grow despite its chaotic politics and frequent coups, appears to be approaching a breaking point.

Update 3: The Daily Beast:

An ‘iron triangle’ made up of the army, senior judges, and royalist supporters continues to deconstruct Thailand’s democratically elected government by means of a rolling judicial coup,” says a retired U.S. diplomat. “It is this iron triangle rather than the country’s electorate that determines who will govern here in Thailand. This iron triangle has deposed three democratically elected prime ministers since 2006 and is on the cusp of deposing a fourth.

 


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29 06 2014
Double standards dictatorship | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] Remember the huge kerfuffle that greeted the ousting of then Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra when the Constitutional Court ruled that she had violated the charter when she transferred of National Security Council chief Thawil Pliensri on coming to office in 2011? The anti-democrats screamed about this for a considerable time and the biased court agreed with them in yet another of its politicized edicts. […]

29 06 2014
Double standards dictatorship | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] Remember the huge kerfuffle that greeted the ousting of then Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra when the Constitutional Court ruled that she had violated the charter when she transferred of National Security Council chief Thawil Pliensri on coming to office in 2011? The anti-democrats screamed about this for a considerable time and the biased court agreed with them in yet another of its politicized edicts. […]

12 01 2015
When transfers are acceptable | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] then Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra was dismissed by a verdict of the Constitutional Court. Her “crime” was to transfer one official, or as the New York Times stated it, “having impure motives when she transferred a bureaucrat […]

16 01 2015
Preparing the anti-democrats | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] Court over recent years. Rather we just point to a few earlier accounts of these actions: here, here, here, here and […]

16 01 2015
Preparing the anti-democrats | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] Court over recent years. Rather we just point to a few earlier accounts of these actions: here, here, here, here and […]

18 01 2015
Purge and the military takeover | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] Almost a week ago, PPT commented on more than 200 transfers in the police, all of them made for political reasons. We pointed out the obvious double standards if this political exercise was compared with the May 2014 Constitutional Court decision that sacked then Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra a transfer of one official. […]

18 01 2015
Purge and the military takeover | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] January 18, 2015 · by Political prisoners of thailand · in Uncategorized · Leave a comment Almost a week ago, PPT commented on more than 200 transfers in the police, all of them made for political reasons. We pointed out the obvious double standards if this political exercise was compared with the May 2014 Constitutional Court decision that sacked then Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra a transfer of one official. […]




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