Tin pot tyrants III

30 06 2014

As we noted in a recent post, double standards are normal operating procedure for the tin pot dictators. Media reports continue to emphasize this.

Prachatai reports a squad of fully-decked out soldiers descending on a lone fried squid vendor in Chiang Mai, demanding he “remove his red t-shirt screened with a face of the red shirt leader Chatuporn Prompan, citing the intention to reconcile and end political conflict.” These bullies, as representatives of The Dictator, “forced him to remove the t-shirt citing the Martial Law.” When he removed the shirt in the face of their threats, the soldiers confiscated the t-shirt!

In other words, a relatively poor man, struggling to make a living, is a threat to the regime and its grand reconciliation. This man may not have even been protesting. Yet no protest, no matter if silent, online or involving symbolism is taboo. Yet anti-democratic protests that support the regime are quite okay.

As Khaosod reports it, while “anti-coup protests are strictly forbidden under Thailand’s military regime, anti-American protests are perfectly legal…”.

The police decided that a protest outside the U.S. Embassy, by a man supporting the coup “did not count as a protest.” Of course, PPT considers that the man should be allowed to protest, yet the double standards are wider than ever under the military dictatorship.

Why was this not a protest? The dopes in the police explained that there were “[n]o chaotic incidents…”. Of course, the “chaotic incidents” on the part of anti-coup protests have been created by the police as they arrest people, not by the protesters.

The cops babbled that: “This man’s actions do not count as a violation of the legal ban on political protests, because it was merely an expression of anger.” It might be thought that this now creates a semi-legal basis for individual anti-coup protesters to express anger over the miltiary’s putsch. We’d guess that this is where the double standards would again come into play. No anti-coup or pro-red shirt protest is permitted.

 

 


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4 responses

3 07 2014
Sandwiches and a good read | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] the man who showed up for a protest at the U.S. Embassy in what the military junta’s flunkeys decided was a non-protest. Anti-coup protesters, mainly students, decided to test the police and stage further non-protests […]

3 07 2014
Sandwiches and a good read | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] the man who showed up for a protest at the U.S. Embassy in what the military junta’s flunkeys decided was a non-protest. Anti-coup protesters, mainly students, decided to test the police and stage further non-protests […]

9 07 2014
Military madness | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] the past 24 hours, fully kitted out soldiers in Chiang Mai have again raided a fried squid vendor. About 10 days ago, troops forced a squid seller to remove a red t-shirt. The soldiers have bounded into their armored […]

9 07 2014
Military madness | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] the past 24 hours, fully kitted out soldiers in Chiang Mai have again raided a fried squid vendor. About 10 days ago, troops forced a squid seller to remove a red t-shirt. The soldiers have bounded into their armored […]




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