Military madness

9 07 2014

In signs of the times, the military appears to have become, if it is even possible, more paranoid about opposition to their regime. Two stories illustrate the developing irrationality and delusion that accompanies the seizure of power by the junta as it sees opposition lurking everywhere and seeks to control and repress.

The royalist credentials of the military’s dictatorship are not in question. However, the desire to appear loyal means that royalist repression becomes bizarre repression. Prachatai reports that a woman who, on 4 July, joined “other protesters at the [U.S.] embassy,” was “detained twice by the plain-clothes authorities, but was then released.” It is reported that the “police also had the record that she also joined the protest against the coup at the Bangkok Art and Cultural Center a day after the coup…”. On 6 July, they arrested her at her house and she is detained at the Crime Suppression Division.

Chaowanat Musikphumi’s “crime,” apart from opposing the coup, is that:

by holding the placard “Long Live USA Day,” she may have violated the Article 112 under the Criminal Code or the lese majeste law. The police accused that the phrase aimed at parodying “Long Live the King.”

She reportedly “tried to explain to the police that the phrase ‘long live’ can be used in many contexts.” She may as well have been speaking to robots for there is little comprehension from from the junta’s Orwelian automatons.

In a second example of paranoia reported in the past 24 hours, fully kitted out soldiers in Chiang Mai have again raided a fried squid vendor. About 10 days ago, troops forced a squid seller to remove a red t-shirt. The soldiers have bounded into their armored humvee to return to the street vendor’s stall “and removed stickers with Pheu Thai party logo and its slogan from the tank ice box used in the shop.” As far as PPT is aware, the party is still kind of legal – to the extent that anything is under this essentially lawless junta – so the effort to expunge its symbols is demonstrative of the dictatorship’s developing political madness.

Apparently this was confirmed when the soldiers stated that they “did not want to see political symbol in the public.”

Squid sellers going about their normal business are apparently a threat to peace, order and military-style “happiness.”

 

 


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9 07 2014
9 07 2014
On being in the network | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] by Yul Brynner in the Broadway musical The King and I.” The King and I is banned in Thailand. Think of the woman being threatened with lese majeste because she used “long live” the w…! Bill’s either got big balls or plenty of support and […]

9 07 2014
On being in the network | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] by Yul Brynner in the Broadway musical The King and I.” The King and I is banned in Thailand. Think of the woman being threatened with lese majeste because she used “long live” the wrong way! Bill’s either got big balls or plenty of support and […]




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