Comedy and the coup I

9 08 2014

The Leader, General Prayuth Chan-ocha, is also something of a comedian. While he may not be impressed by John Oliver, he is surely influenced by the BBC comedy game show “Would I Lie to You?

In that show, contestants must “hoodwink each other into believing that what is fake is true, and what is true is not.” Often they end up claiming the most bizarre “truths,” and the comedy is in the outrageous lies they must concoct. That’s surely the model for Prayuth latest attempt to hoodwink the world with two classic one-liners.

Prayuth’s first line was his “pledge” that his military junta “will not interfere with national reform…”.

His capacity to hoodwink might have been a little limited by his illegal coup on 22 May, by his establishment of his hand-picked puppet assembly and by the fact that it was he “as the junta leader [who] kicked off the process on Saturday.” He may not have been helped by the fact that the launch was “at the Royal Thai Army Club.”

But Prayuth’s a real trooper and tried his best to convince. It was classic comedy.

His second line was a repeat of an earlier effort to hoodwink the public when he reiterated that “he had made the decision by himself to lead soldiers onto the streets with no involvement from … the [k]ing.”

Of course, this is a difficult “sell.” We almost felt that The Leader was speaking directly to PPT when he was forced to press just a bit too much when he said: ”Don’t ever drag His Majesty into this. His Majesty never issued an order. [I] pay respect to his image every day and ask for his pardon…”.

He may have had not a few rolling about with laughter, but no one can believe his lies.


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10 08 2014
More on succession | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] thinks about Thailand’s monarchy. The recent coup hasn’t helped the monarchy either, and the military dictatorship’s repeated denials of the palace’s involvement only confirms suspicions that the old men of the palace are continually […]

10 08 2014
More on succession | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] about Thailand’s monarchy. The recent coup hasn’t helped the monarchy either, and the military dictatorship’s repeated denials of the palace’s involvement only confirms suspicions that the old men of the palace are continually […]




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