Torture of detainees

8 09 2014

To date, the most serious claim of mistreatment and torture while in military detention was from the now exiled Kritsuda Khunasen. Not only was she illegally detained by the junta, but she claimed to have been suffocated and physically assaulted.

Prachatai now has a story that says Thai Lawyers for Human Rights has reported that “14 people were tortured and ill-treated during military detention…” during the first 100 days of the military dictatorship with a total of 571 persons having been detained. The allegations of mistreatment involved people being “tortured physically and psychologically by the army.”

Some “[e]x-detainees reported that they were beaten and electrocuted. This is against the military assurances that all detainees will be treated well during detention.” Of course, it was widely reported that the military demanded that each detainee sign a statement affirming that they had been treated well during detention.

Most of those who allege torture “are red shirt supporters or former red-shirt guards. The military allegedly tortured them to force them to confess of using weapons to create situations in various parts of Bangkok during political turbulence since late last year…”.

Other reports were:

that some detainees were blindfolded to their detention locations with handcuff and robes. Some were kicked, punched, suffocated, and were electrocuted on their genitals. They were also blindfolded while they were fed by the officials without knowing what they were eating and were not allowed to take a shower. Moreover, they had been verbally abused by officials who threaten to harm their families.

Some of the detainees were held for periods “exceeding the limit of seven days, allowed by the martial law.”

According to report, of the “571 people summoned by the junta since the coup, at least 266 were arrested. The overwhelming majority of 396 were associated with the red-shirt camp. Another 142 were academics and activists and 98 were those who participated in the peaceful protest.”


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13 09 2014
AI on martial law | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] release follows an earlier report by Thai Lawyers for Human Rights that reported on torture and ill-treated during military detention during the first 100 days of the […]

13 09 2014
AI on martial law | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] release follows an earlier report by Thai Lawyers for Human Rights that reported on torture and ill-treated during military detention during the first 100 days of the […]

15 09 2014
Targeting red shirts | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] is promoting reconciliation. Of course, the data on detentions and arrests show this is untrue (see here and […]

15 09 2014
Targeting red shirts | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] is promoting reconciliation. Of course, the data on detentions and arrests show this is untrue (see here and […]




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