AI on martial law

13 09 2014

A few days ago Amnesty International released an important report on the impact of martial law in Thailand following the May 2014 military coup and the resulting military dictatorship.

AI - CopyThis release follows an earlier report by Thai Lawyers for Human Rights that reported on torture and ill-treated during military detention during the first 100 days of the military dictatorship. The numbers reported there and in the AI report are roughly comparable.

The report is available in English and Thai as PDFs and is also available as an HTML online file. The web-based introduction to the report states:

On 22 May 2014, two days after declaring Martial Law, Thailand’s military took power for the second time in eight years. Under the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) the military abrogated all but one section of the 2007 Constitution, sacked the government, dissolved parliament and assumed full control of the country. As this report will show, the NCPO has undertaken a series of measures that have altered Thailand’s institutional and legal framework. The human rights violations detailed in this report also reflect long-standing human rights problems in Thailand.

AI ThaiAs would be expected of a military dictatorship, the details provided by AI in this report are denied by the regime.

Khaosod reports that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has “flatly denied allegations put forth in an Amnesty International report detailing widespread human rights violations under Thailand’s military regime.”

A spokesperson for the Ministry said the report “does not accurately reflect the situation in Thailand.”

The report detailed arbitrary detention, torture and other abuses by the military junta and condemned the military dictatorship for its repression and sweeping censorship, also noting the regime’s political bias.

In response, the MFA babbled about how “Thai authorities have relaxed many of their powers in recent weeks,” but produced no evidence other than a claim about “media freedom,” which is simply a lie.

On torture, the rebuttal is confirmation of the observation that the junta is a bunch of dangerous dictators, for it says the claims are baseless as the junta has investigated and found no evidence of mistreatment. The junta investigates itself and comes up smelling of roses! It smells roses and we smell fish.

The junta’s MFA mouthpiece rambled about the junta having widespread support. If that sounds rather North Korean, read this report too, detailing the nature of the regime and The Dictator.

The following is AI’s summary of detentions:

AI text

 

 


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2 responses

15 09 2014
Targeting red shirts | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] When Khaosod changed its location, we missed commenting on this story. Since its coup, the military dictatorship has repeatedly claimed that it is promoting reconciliation. Of course, the data on detentions and arrests show this is untrue (see here and here). […]

15 09 2014
Targeting red shirts | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] September 15, 2014 · by Political prisoners of thailand · in Uncategorized · Leave a comment When Khaosod changed its location, we missed commenting on this story. Since its coup, the military dictatorship has repeatedly claimed that it is promoting reconciliation. Of course, the data on detentions and arrests show this is untrue (see here and here). […]




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