Military corruption and politics

14 10 2014

When the story of three serving and retired naval officers being caught with millions of dollars of counterfeit U.S. banknotes in Cambodia, PPT didn’t have an opportunity to post about it. Now a longer and more detailed story at the Bangkok Post is available, we thought it warranted a brief comment.

As has become clear in recent days, the military brass in Thailand is riddled with corruption. Naval officers seem particularly adept at becoming “unusually wealthy,” as our clip from an earlier post indicates, there are at least four whales that need to explain their huge wealth.Navy

Of course, there may be no connection at all between whales and beached naval officers in Cambodia hauling around $7 million in counterfeit currency in cardboard boxes brought from Thailand.

Yet the U.S. Secret Service seems to think that “the huge bust points to a well-oiled and growing counterfeit operation in neighbouring Thailand, where identical notes had previously been seized.”

The navy has yet to comment in any detail.

We are reminded that the navy played a critical role in supporting and protecting the anti-democrats as they prepared the ground for a military coup. Prior to the coup in May, Naval Special Warfare Command (SEAL) commander Winai Klom-in was a strong supporter of the anti-democrats, providing serving and retired Seals as guards. All of this costs money, and we are sure that there is a need to pay some of this back.

The idea that the military brass is trying to cash up again following the coup is worthy of consideration, and this is sure to involve both personal and institutional funds expended in preparing for the coup through the support of the costly anti-democrat demonstrations.


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18 10 2014
Further updated: Slavery and the dictatorship | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] slavers than monarchy. A reader comments that the slave business in one likely explanation for the incredible wealth of some naval officers. We tend to concur based on previous reporting and the ferocious but boneheaded approach by the […]

18 10 2014
Further updated: Slavery and the dictatorship | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] slavers than monarchy. A reader comments that the slave business in one likely explanation for the incredible wealth of some naval officers. We tend to concur based on previous reporting and the ferocious but boneheaded approach by the […]

19 10 2014
The Dictator’s lies | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] As our readers know, the salary and allowances are chump change for the military brass. They make millions from corrupt activities. […]

23 10 2014
Defending The Dictator | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] Post, Education Minister Adm Narong Pipatanasai – there’s a reasonable chance that, like most admirals, he’s worth a packet! – has defended the trite dicta of The Dictator that have become the equivalent of […]