Tinpot dictatorship

8 02 2015

The Financial Times acknowledges that the military dictatorship is exactly that:

No one can harbour illusions about the generals who seized power last May with the claim of restoring harmony to Thailand’s long-fractious political scene. It is now crystal clear, if it was not from the very outset, that the coup leaders are part of the problem, not part of the solution.

It acknowledges that The Dictator “General Prayuth Chan-ocha and his fellow military men have imposed a dictatorship only too willing to use the powers of the state to silence critics.” Like so many others the FT seems to have hoped that a bunch of ill-educated and murderous generals would “restore democracy” to Thailand. It acknowledges that:

… this seems to be the last thing on the junta’s mind. Rather, the suspicion is it wants to stay in power long enough to oversee the delicate business of royal succession when King Bhumibol Adulyadej, ailing and 87, eventually dies. At the very least, it seeks to recast the rules such that politicians it considers irresponsibly populist can never be elected again. It is a vision of “managed democracy” that the harder-line generals in Myanmar would fully understand.

On the attempts to yet again destroy Thailand’s most popular political party, the FT acknowledges that in its “impeachment” process, “the military government has dealt in anecdote and innuendo. So far, it has not proved the scheme was anything other than a policy it did not like. This looks like political vengeance, not the rule of law.”

The FT also acknowledges that the junta is fixing the political game in its own and its supporters’ interests: “The generals’ hopes to influence the course of future democratic exercises through fixing the rules are shabby and unworkable.”

The FT says its supporters are “the elite and business community who argue that it has restored stability.” Fascist regimes always bring stability through oppression, but it is, as the FT says, a ruse: “stability built on repression is no stability at all.”


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8 05 2015
Impeachment | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] the NACC can ever produce evidence for its claims that would hold up in an independent court. As the Financial Times commented some time ago, about the Yingluck show trial, “the military government has dealt in anecdote and innuendo. So […]

8 05 2015
Impeachment | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] the NACC can ever produce evidence for its claims that would hold up in an independent court. As the Financial Times commented some time ago, about the Yingluck show trial, “the military government has dealt in anecdote and innuendo. So […]




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