Unelected PM and other anti-democratic plans

28 02 2015

We recently posted on the unelected senate that will work to keep the military at the center of power. If that wasn’t sufficient in the rolling back of electoral politics some 25 years, the puppet Constitution Drafting Committee has now approved a non-elected prime minister.

The puppets met on Thursday in Pattaya. Why? Who knows, given that it was an in-camera meeting. Perhaps in the words of an old Post correspondent on the night industries, they felt like some rubs and suds? Perhaps they wanted to golf or eat free seafood?

Whatever the motivation, they “approved a provision that will open the position of prime minister to both MPs and outsiders.” That’s the Post’s way of ridiculous way of saying that the fascists want an unelected premier, most likely a “retired” general and maybe even a Dictator.

The model is the era when the great political meddler General Prem Tinsulanonda represented the monarchy as prime minister.

Apparently 17 of the 31 who attended the meeting wanted this arrangement. The others were said to be tied up with other arrangements. (The mind boggles when this is considered in the context of Pattaya and closed door meetings.)

An unelected senate, an unelected premier and a constituency system that means smaller and weak parties and coalitions. This is a model for the 1980s.

One aspect that seems new is a strange provision that the (perhaps unelected) prime minister “can decide which legislative bills are significant and require endorsement by the House.” (Presumably “insignificant” bills can slip by through executive fiat?) When a “significant” bills are “tabled to the House, the opposition is given only 48 hours to decide whether to propose a no-confidence motion against the government over the bills.” If the opposition doesn’t demand a no-confidence vote “within 48 hours, the bills are deemed to be passed by the House…”.

It seems increasingly unnecessary to even have a parliament, which is what anti-democrats seem to prefer.


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