The military dictatorship II

8 03 2015

Conservatives, royalists, rightists, anti-democrats and even royals make much of Thailand’s difference or distinctiveness when compared with the rest of the world. They assert that Thailand, its history and its politics is “different from every other place in the world.

In one respect, they are right, and Wikipedia’s page on military dictatorship proves this:

DictatorshipYes, according to this source, Thailand is indeed unique! It is the only country in the world run by a military dictatorship.

PrachataiWe might quibble with the listing – after all, the military junta did appoint puppet assemblies and so on –  but the point is clear enough: Thailand is suffering a dinosaur regime, best fitted to the 1950s and 1960s, when there were many military leaders who felt it their duty to protect the interests of a privileged elite.

And, if one examines even the headlines from, say, Prachatai, the image is that the military junta is getting on with self-assigned job, dictating.

This military dictatorship is repressing, controlling, jailing, threatening and seeing enemies in every corner of the nation.

Military dictatorships in Thailand are associated with periods of shared and growing wealth between monarchy, military and Sino-Thai tycoons. They are also associated with a political dark age of extreme royalism, repression and fear.

 


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11 03 2015
Defining political inanity II | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] As Thailand is possibly the only military dictatorship in the world, has probably had more military putsches than any other nation and has a regime that prefers authoritarian royalism to other ideologies, we expect that the comparisons might be thin. […]

11 03 2015
Defining political inanity II | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] As Thailand is possibly the only military dictatorship in the world, has probably had more military putsches than any other nation and has a regime that prefers authoritarian royalism to other ideologies, we expect that the comparisons might be thin. […]




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