Further updated: Blame and other games

12 04 2015

Readers will be aware of the deadly [sorry, not deadly, but certainly damaging] car bomb in Koh Samui, causing several injuries. There is little evidence about the culprits or about the reasons for the bombing. There has been no claim of responsibility to date.

What is remarkable is that all political sides seem to agree that the attack was politically motivated, and as The Nation reports it, “aimed at challenging the government.”

The junta claims “there were ill-intentioned groups seeking an opportunity to disturb peace and instigate violence.” It reckons that because it has cracked down so hard in Bangkok that “the perpetrators have moved to other areas.”

Democrat Party deputy leader Nipit Intarasombat said the bomb “was the work of anti-government groups and had nothing to do with the southern insurgency…. The culprits focused on a tourism place. They want to demonstrate their power…”.

Thaworn Senneam of the anti-democratic People’s Democratic Reform Committee said the attack “was the work of someone who wanted to cause problems for the government and the country’s economy…”.

Puea Thai Party’s Worachai Hema believed “the attack was aimed to discredit the government after it imposed Article 44 to keep peace and order.”

PPT got a bit lost, however, when the junta spokesman said “initial reports revealed that the people responsible for the car bomb was the same group that had planted a bomb in Bangkok.” We understood that the junta had claimed to have arrested those responsible for the Bangkok bombing. Yet this turns out to be the wrong bombing!

Military “intelligence” suggests that “there is a possibility that the perpetrators were southern insurgents or natives of southern border provinces who have expertise in assembling car bombs and were hired with the same motivation as in the case of the bomb blast on Soi Ramkhamhaeng 43/1 in Bangkok…”.

That bomb was on 26 May 2013, injuring seven people. Conveniently, those responsible were sentenced less than three weeks ago. As far as we know, these men, all from Pattani, did not give up anyone else.

That attack, when the Yingluck Shinawatra elected government was in office, has been attributed to “southern insurgents.” A report in The Nation observed that some linked 2014 blasts in “Sadao and Phuket [to] attacks back to the May 26, 2013 attack on Ramkhamhaeng Soi 43/1 by an insurgent cell.” It added that political leaders at the time “maintain[ed] the Ramkhamhaeng bombing was not linked to unrest in the deep South…”. Yet, “security officials confirmed that the attack was a bid by one of the longstanding separatist groups to enhance its leverage in negotiations…”.

That report also stated that “a group did claim responsibility for the Ramkhamhaeng operation, stating its aim was to be at the negotiating table.”

If readers can explain all of this confusion, we’d be happy to learn more.

Update 1: Not prizes for guessing what this update is about. The Bangkok Post reports that all of the politicians quoted above, as well as the junta spokesmen, may all be wrong. The report states that “might have been caused by a local business or political conflict…”. That’s “according to a report from the government committee on solving problems in the southern border provinces.” At the same time, a red shirt supporter has been detained.

Update 2: As noted in our first update, a red shirt supporter had been arrested. Khaosod reports that Narin Ambuathong was arrested in Nonthaburi on 11 April. The military dictatorship’s spokesman stated that Narin was arrested an held under the draconian Article 44 of the junta’s interim institution, which allows the military to search properties and detain individuals without warrants and to interrogate them in secret, usually military, locations for seven days. He was arrested because of Facebook posts that appeared to refer to trouble in Suratthani. This report also refers to a fire that “broke out at Surat Thani Cooperative Store on the mainland, though no one was injured. Police say the store belongs to Suthep Thaugsuban, former deputy chairman of Democrat Party and leader of the street protests…”. While the idea of a cooperative being owned by Suthep seems odd, the implication is that the bomb and fire were linked political acts. Despite the earlier claimed link to the Soi Ramkhamhaeng bombing of 2013, the report says the “military junta has also insisted that the incidents are not related to the ongoing insurgency in the southern border provinces…”. They seem to be having trouble getting their story straight.


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14 04 2015
On the Surat Thani cooperative | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] In an update to an earlier post on the car bombing and fire, PPT mentioned that a report mentioned the fire that broke out at Surat Thani Cooperative Store. Police had said that the store belonged to Suthep Thaugsuban, former deputy chairman of Democrat Party and leader of the anti-democratic street protests that led to the 2014 coup. […]

14 04 2015
On the Surat Thani cooperative | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] In an update to an earlier post on the car bombing and fire, PPT mentioned that a report mentioned the fire that broke out at Surat Thani Cooperative Store. Police had said that the store belonged to Suthep Thaugsuban, former deputy chairman of Democrat Party and leader of the anti-democratic street protests that led to the 2014 coup. […]

20 04 2015
Red shirts, black shirts | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] Readers will recall that the military nabbed Narin after the blast, which they immediately blamed on red shirts or political powers of the past, while discounting southern insurgents. Anti-democrat Suthep Thaugsuban, hiding in a monastery, going further and fingering Thaksin Shinawatra. […]

20 04 2015
Red shirts, black shirts | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] Readers will recall that the military nabbed Narin after the blast, which they immediately blamed on red shirts or political powers of the past, while discounting southern insurgents. Anti-democrat Suthep Thaugsuban, hiding in a monastery, going further and fingering Thaksin Shinawatra. […]

14 05 2015
Political bombs | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] may recall the hocus pocus on the car bomb in Koh Samui and a fire at a Suratthani “cooperative” owned by Suthep […]

14 05 2015
Political bombs? | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] may recall the hocus pocus on the car bomb in Koh Samui and a fire at a Suratthani “cooperative” owned by Suthep […]