US still wrong on lese majeste

29 06 2015

PPT has, each year, been critical of the U.S. State Department’s report on human rights for failing to acknowledge that the lese majeste law is a political law and that almost all of those held under this law are political prisoners. This year (referring to 2014), the report moves a little closer, but still can’t accept that lese majeste is used for explicitly political purposes and for political repression. This is what the report says:

Political Prisoners and Detainees112
Prior to the May 22 coup, there were no government reports of political prisoners or detainees, but sources estimated that 20 persons remained detained under lese majeste laws that outlaw criticism of the monarchy (see section 2.a.). Some of the cases involved persons exercising their rights of freedom of expression and peaceful assembly. Following the May 22 coup, the military government opened at least 15 new lese majeste cases for investigation as of September, while authorities also revived other cases in which officials had not previously filed charges.


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3 07 2015
Delusions on rights | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] a couple of days. It was a junta response to the U.S. State Department’s human rights report. We had a short comment on that report, but didn’t go into any details for any sane observer of Thailand since the 2014 military […]

3 07 2015
Delusions on rights | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] a couple of days. It was a junta response to the U.S. State Department’s human rights report. We had a short comment on that report, but didn’t go into any details for any sane observer of Thailand since the 2014 military […]




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