The junta’s prize

24 03 2018

Some time ago PPT raised concerns regarding the direction of the Cambodian government as it seemed more than will to deal on exchanges of political opponents seeking refuge in Thailand and vice versa.

The step-by-step process of arranging exchanges of those seeking refuge in the other country has now reached an important milestone.

Prachatai reports that “Phnom Penh has agreed to help Thailand in hunting for Thai fugitives. This confirms the concerns among Thai refugee communities in Cambodia and human rights organisations that both countries are making a deal on exchanging political refugees.”

On 21 March, one of Cambodia’s political thugs, Tea Banh visited Thailand’s Dictator “to discuss cooperation between Thailand and Cambodia.” Among other things, the two agreed “that both countries would help each other in searching for fugitives to further strengthen the relationship.”

This agreement makes “the situation of Thai political exiles in Cambodia even more precarious, given that about a hundred Thais are living in exile in Phnom Penh after the 2014 coup to escape legal harassment.”

As the article points out, the enactment of a lese majeste law in Cambodia seems designed to allow the extradition of Thai lese majeste fugitives from Cambodia. Extradition usually requires a similar law in both countries, and that now applies for Cambodia. Then again, neither Thailand nor Cambodia worry too much about law.


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27 03 2018
A catch-up I | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] From Erich Parpart, Senior Reporter, Bangkok Post’s Asia Focus: He gets  basic facts are right. But some claims are warped. He says ” that the law in Thailand has long been abused for political purposes by those on both sides of the political spectrum.” In fact, by far the vast majority of lese majeste accusations have come from rightists and royalists damning their political opponents. (How many royalists are in exile escaping lese majeste charges? None.) Like others he says “[s]ince the coup of 2014, more than 90 people have been prosecuted for lese majeste and 43 have been sentenced.” This is wrong. As we have said several times, our data shows far higher numbers. He says the “most egregious application of the law in recent memory involved Sulak Sivaraksa.” This is completely wrong. Sulak got off. The cases of those who didn’t and were sentenced to jail for decades for saying “nothing,” for graffiti, for Facebook posts are far more egregious. When he writes of lese majeste in Cambodia he needs to read our recent post. […]

27 03 2018
A catch-up I | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] From Erich Parpart, Senior Reporter, Bangkok Post’s Asia Focus: He gets  basic facts are right. But some claims are warped. He says ” that the law in Thailand has long been abused for political purposes by those on both sides of the political spectrum.” In fact, by far the vast majority of lese majeste accusations have come from rightists and royalists damning their political opponents. (How many royalists are in exile escaping lese majeste charges? None.) Like others he says “[s]ince the coup of 2014, more than 90 people have been prosecuted for lese majeste and 43 have been sentenced.” This is wrong. As we have said several times, our data shows far higher numbers. He says the “most egregious application of the law in recent memory involved Sulak Sivaraksa.” This is completely wrong. Sulak got off. The cases of those who didn’t and were sentenced to jail for decades for saying “nothing,” for graffiti, for Facebook posts are far more egregious. When he writes of lese majeste in Cambodia he needs to read our recent post. […]