Updated: Rap against the military dictatorship

27 10 2018

There is a series of three articles at The Nation that report the military dictatorship’s predictable response to a group of 10 rappers and their popular video that raps the junta.

The video, at YouTube in two versions, has had close to 6 million views. There have been millions more on Facebook.

In the first report, Deputy national police chief Srivara Ransibrahmanakul declaring that the song may be breaking the law and that “officers from the Technology Crime Suppression Division of the Royal Thai Police will check out the lyrics to see if they violate any junta orders.”

Yes, the junta’s laws, not real laws, but the politicized repression and suppression shrouded in law. Confirming this, the political policeman added that the “rappers would also be summoned to testify whether they had intended to cause any chaos or violate any National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) orders…”.

The junta’s cop warned: “… musicians not to do anything that risks violating the country’s laws, as it wouldn’t be good for them or their families if the songs were deemed to violate the law…”.

Threatening opponents and their families is standard practice under the military dictatorship.

A few hours later, a second report states that the political police were to use the Computer Crimes Act against the rappers. It accuses the rap of breaking the political law that “prohibits computer information inconsistent with the truth, undermines national security or causes public panic…”. In this, “truth” is defined by the junta.

As might be expected, in one of his first public statements, new government spokesman, the anti-democrat Buddhipongse Punnakanta, claimed that the junta’s opponents were “behind” the video. Of course, anti-democrats like him and his bosses cannot conceive of any person being capable of independent thought.

The third report summarizes events and the song that denounces the junta. It notes that the rap was released on an important date: 14 October, being the 45th anniversary of the October 1973 uprising against a military dictatorship. The YouTube video also depicts 6 October 1976 royalist violence with an image of a student hanging from a tree being beaten, as in 1976.

Reflecting on the junta’s “truth,” one of the rappers stated: “As artists we want to reflect the truth of the society we are living in under dictatorship. Thailand seems to be caught in a loop of dictatorship. We want to voice what the majority cannot say directly.”

The video is dedicated to the victims of the state’s crimes.

Update: With the military dictatorship in full panic mode over the popularity of this rap, Puea Thai’s Chaturon Chaisaeng is reported to have warned the junta against arresting the performers of the anti-junta song. He said said that “if the Rap Against Dictatorship (RAD) group was arrested, it would backfire against the government to the point where the government could fall.”


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4 responses

3 11 2018
Has the NACC completed its cover-up II? | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] in fact, it is likely to be a response to the hugely popular rap attack on the military dictatorship that has triggered the slavish response. That video is now over 27 million views, despite efforts […]

3 11 2018
Has the NACC completed its cover-up II? | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] in fact, it is likely to be a response to the hugely popular rap attack on the military dictatorship that has triggered the slavish response. That video is now over 27 million views, despite efforts […]

6 11 2018
Shocking calendars threaten regime stability | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] his brothers in the military dictatorship and all they stood for. He declared that the rappers had probably broken the law and threatened them and those sharing the popular video. He soon backed down, acknowledging that he […]

6 11 2018
Shocking calendars threaten regime stability | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] his brothers in the military dictatorship and all they stood for. He declared that the rappers had probably broken the law and threatened them and those sharing the popular video. He soon backed down, acknowledging that he […]




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