Rolling back 1932 II

28 12 2018

It was back in mid-2017 that we had our first “rolling back 1932” post. Since then, most of our posts on this topic have had to do with King Vajiralongkorn’s property grabbing in the so-called royal precinct.

That earlier post on 1932 was prompted by the property grabs but more especially by the 2017 theft of a People’s Party plaque and its replacement by a royalist plaque, seeking to erase memories and symbols of 1932. All of this was done in secret, at night and with no explanation at all. Rather, people who asked questions were jailed.

Now, another symbol of that historic period of anti-royalism has been secretly removed.First on social media and then at Khaosod, it is reported that the:

historic monument that commemorated government victory over a pro-monarchy rebellion eight decades ago was removed Thursday night without notice or explanation.

Activists and historians fear that the Constitution Defense Monument, which stood at the Laksi Intersection in northern Bangkok, could be destroyed after security forces were seen taking it away in the early hours.

The now missing monument celebrated 1932, the end of the absolute monarchy and specifically the defeat of rebellious royal forces by the People’s Party, its army and the people of Bangkok in 1933. Known as the Boworadej Rebellion, it was led by Prince Boworadej and supported by the anti-democratic King Prajadhipok.

Chatri Prakitnonthakarn, who teaches history of Thai architecture at Silpakorn University stated: “We don’t know where it is now. There’s a risk that the monument will be gone for good…”.  He worried that the monument has met the “same fate … as the plaque.”

According to Khaosod, those who should know what was going on claimed total ignorance:

Bang Khen district chief Somboon Homnan maintained he didn’t know anything about the removal. He said the monument was located in an area governed by the state railway, which is building an elevated railway nearby….

MRT deputy governor Surachet Laophulsuk, who oversees the railway construction project, declined to comment….

Junta spokesman Col. Winthai Suvari could not be reached as of publication time.

Pro-democracy activist Karn Pongpraphapan “went to the site Thursday night after hearing about the sudden operation.” Police monitoring the operation
“confiscated his phone at about 3am Friday just as he was trying to begin a live video stream via Facebook Live.”

Karn also said “one of the soldiers at the scene refused to tell him why the monument was being removed.” He just said “secret.”

Like many others, PPT can only guess that this is another deliberate plaque-like removal as part of the re-feudalization of Thailand.

Since the accession of King Vajiralongkorn there has been a rapid unwinding of arrangements regarding the relationship between crown and state that were put in place following the 1932 Revolution.

Since coming to the throne, almost everything the king has done has challenged decades-old arrangements that have long annoyed the royal family. It seems clear that he has imbibed the anti-1932 bile that has circulated in the family. He joins a long line of relatives who plotted and schemed against the People’s Party and its legacy. He’s being quite successful in this because he is supported by the royalist military junta and its authoritarianism.


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15 responses

1 01 2019
Fears for Surachai | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] the sudden removal of the 1932 plaque, the Lak Si constitutional memorial and the disappearance Surachai has received little mainstream media attention, suggesting that many […]

1 01 2019
Fears for Surachai | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] the sudden removal of the 1932 plaque, the Lak Si constitutional memorial and the disappearance Surachai has received little mainstream media attention, suggesting that many […]

3 01 2019
Fears for Surachai II | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] of other, less dramatic disappearances like a plaque and a memorial? Are all these disappearances politically […]

3 01 2019
Fears for Surachai II | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] of other, less dramatic disappearances like a plaque and a memorial? Are all these disappearances politically […]

3 01 2019
Fears for Surachai I | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] the sudden removal of the 1932 plaque, the Lak Si constitutional memorial and the disappearance Surachai has received little mainstream media attention, suggesting that many […]

5 01 2019
Updates on disappeared Surachai and disappeared monument | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] in ruins: About a week ago, PPT posted on the removal of another monument associated with the People’s Party and its […]

5 01 2019
Updates on disappeared Surachai and disappeared monument | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] in ruins: About a week ago, PPT posted on the removal of another monument associated with the People’s Party and its […]

28 01 2019
All the king’s servants III | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] expansion is not unrelated to the royal “missing”: a 1932 plaque, a 1932/33 memorial, anti-monarchists and the former public properties now privatized as the king’s. Likewise, […]

28 01 2019
All the king’s servants III | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] expansion is not unrelated to the royal “missing”: a 1932 plaque, a 1932/33 memorial, anti-monarchists and the former public properties now privatized as the king’s. Likewise, […]

19 03 2019
Get rid of the junta | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] missing 1932 memorials while unthinking conservative royalism is […]

19 03 2019
Get rid of the junta | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] missing 1932 memorials while unthinking conservative royalism is […]

15 04 2019
Watching the republicans | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] is becoming a theme for the new reign, whether it is symbols of the anti-royalist past, palace officials, wives or those identified as […]

15 04 2019
Watching the republicans | Political Prisoners of Thailand

[…] is becoming a theme for the new reign, whether it is symbols of the anti-royalist past, palace officials, wives or those identified as […]

1 10 2019
Forgetfulness | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] the king. Do people really forget his missing missus? Do they forget the missing plaque and the missing monument commemorating the defeat of […]

10 10 2019
1931 moves closer | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] this king there’s also been a concerted effort to expunge the symbols of 1932. It wasn’t that long ago that a monument to the defeat of the royalist restorationist […]