Updated: On elections

18 07 2019

Readers might be interested in a report by Focus on the Global South:

In the first half of 2019, a great deal of global attention focused on national elections in three countries where authoritarian regimes or personalities were in command of the state: Thailand, the Philippines, and India. The big question was: would voters buck the authoritarian trend or affirm it? When the dust settled, the electorates in the three countries had delivered striking, if somewhat divergent results, between Thailand on the one hand and the Philippines and India on the other.This study seeks to shed some light on the electoral outcomes in the three countries by examining the national situation leading up to the elections, understanding the results of the elections by situating them within the dynamics of the broader political process in each country, and engaging in a comparative analysis of the electoral and broader political processes in the three countries, drawing out similarities and differences.

On Thailand it concludes: “In Thailand, the overriding task is how to change an electoral system that hems in and constrains democratic choice with institutions and procedures that are implicitly backed by the firepower of the army.”

Update: Readers might also be interested in two report – a shorter one in English and a longer Thai-language report on the 2019 “election” from P-Net. One of its comments is on the decrepit performance of the puppet Election Commission:

P-NET’s observers are very much unhappy with the ECT’s administration especially the inactive performance of 7 commissioners and their lack of courage (fear) on issuing the yellow and orange tickets to certain candidates in several constituencies in regions before the polling day. ECT could not control the partiality of the government officials to stay neutral, not to support the ruling party and the incumbent PM in their campaigns.


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