Updated: Car trouble I

16 10 2020

There are lots of rumors and plenty of speculation on why the royal cavalcade on October 14 ended up in among the pro-democracy protesters. That error/provocation/royal order/dirty trick (as it variously appears) led to the hurling of abuse at these leeches on the taxpayer.

We have no idea why the regime allowed this to happen, but the scapegoating has been furious. Khaosod reports that “[t]hree police commanders, including an officer who oversaw the crowd control division, were transferred to an inactive post pending investigation on Thursday after a royal motorcade encountered a group of protesters…”.

Police spokesman Maj Gen “Yingyot Thepchamnong said three senior officers are under investigation into why they did not clear the route.” Maj Gen Yingyot observed: “It didn’t go according to plans…. They might have forgotten or misunderstood the details of the plans.”

He was asked the obvious question: “why the royal motorcade was not diverted to a different route”? Maj Gen Yingyot “declined to answer…”.

The report notes that “… reporters at the scene confirmed that they saw no protesters standing in the way of the convoy or throwing any projectiles to the vehicles, which were protected by layers of police officers…”.

That observation becomes critical when it is learned that:

… two prominent pro-democracy activists on charges of using violence on … the Queen.

Ekachai Hongkangwan and Bunkueanun “Francis” Paothong were identified as the suspects in the most serious charge filed by the authorities so far since the waves of anti-government protests began in February. If guilty, they face life in prison.

Both of them were charged under Article 110 of the Criminal Code….

PPT has never heard of this article previously. It turns out that there are six articles on crimes against the monarchy. Article 110 states:

Whoever commits an act of violence against the Queen or Her liberty, the Heir-apparent or His liberty, or the Regent or his/her liberty, shall be punished with imprisonment for life or imprisonment of sixteen to twenty years. Whoever attempts to commit such offence shall be liable to the same punishment.

If such act is likely to endanger the life of the Queen, the Heir-apparent or the Regent, the offender, shall be punished with death or imprisonment for life.

Akechai. Clipped from TLHR

Whoever makes preparations for committing an act of violence against the Queen or Her liberty, the Heir-apparent or His liberty, or the Regent or his/her liberty, or does any act to assist in keeping secret any intention to commit such offence, shall be punished with imprisonment of twelve to twenty years.

Akechai has a long history with the police for his opposition to military authoritarianism and has been attacked by “unknown” assailants several times. His arrest and detention, along with Bunkuenun, brings the known total of arrests over the last three days to more than 50.

Update: Thai Enquirer has more on the framing of Akechai and Bunkuenun. It states:

If you saw the videos, you will see that no one was blocking the royal motorcade; the protestors did not even know that they were coming….

If you watched live around 5.30 p.m. on Wednesday, you would have seen that Ekkachai Hongkangwan and Bunkueanun “Francis” Paothon were not doing anything to harm the Queen’s liberty at all….

Without warning, the police then charged at the protesters before people realized that it was the royal motorcade behind the police.

By that time, Ekkachai and Francis have already been pushed aside along with other protestors as the police formed a human chain to make way for the motorcade.

They were not near the car, and they were not throwing anything.

The opinion piece adds: “So to say that somehow the student protesters were responsible is laughable…“.


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16 10 2020
Car trouble II | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] use of Article 110 of the Criminal Code. The Bangkok Post has almost nothing to say about this. Other outlets have already shown that the charges are a complete fabrication. Worse, the Post fails to read […]

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