Kanlaya gets 6 years on lese majeste

5 08 2022

Narathiwat Provincial Court has been busy with Article 112 cases. Like other royalist courts, it has been jailing people. Just a few days ago we posted on the sentencing of Udom (pseudonym), a 34-year-old factory worker, to 6 years in prison using Article 112 and the Computer Crimes Act. In that post, we also linked to the pending case of Kanlaya, a 27-year-old employee of a company in Nonthaburi, facing lese majeste and computer crimes charges following a complaint by ultra-royalist vigilante Pasit Chanhuaton. The odious Pasit had also complained about Udom.

Kanlaya’s now been sentenced.

Thai Lawyers for Human Rights reports that Kanlaya was found guilty under Article 112 and computer crimes. She was sentenced her to 6 years in prison.

Kanlaya denied the charges.

The complaint against Kanlaya concerned a number of Facebook posts and comments about the King and the 2020 – 2021 pro-democracy protests. iLaw reported that one of the comments was made on a Facebook post about the film The Treacherous, a Korean period drama film about a tyrannical king, which caused another Facebook user to accuse Kanlaya of insulting King Vajiralongkorn, so her friends argued with the person to defend her. She speculated that the user was not happy with what happened and started collecting information from her Facebook page before filing charges against her.

Another post was a picture Kanlaya took during a protest at Wongwian Yai on 17 October 2020 of a message sprayed-painted onto the road. She was also charged for sharing posts made by exiled academic Somsak Jeamteerasakul and activist Tanawat Wongchai and adding comments to them.

The “evidence” against her “included made up screenshots without a URL or a date and time of the posts, so they could have been edited, while each post could be interpreted widely if read separately and mentioned no one by name.”

But the royalist court was unconvinced and went to work concocting its conviction:

… the Court ruled that she was guilty because she testified during the police inquiry process that her former partner used to be able to access her Facebook account, but she changed the password after they broke up in December 2020, so it is believable that she was the one using the account.

The Court also ruled that the messages combined with the movement for monarchy reform can be interpreted to be referring to King Vajiralongkorn, and that they are intended to cause hatred against the King, affecting national security.

Thai Lawyers for Human Rights says ultra-mad royalist Pasit has now filed 112 “complaints with the police in Sungai Kolok against at least 20 people, none of whom lives in Narathiwat.”

Kanlaya was granted bail in order to appeal.  She was bailed.


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