Other Issues of Political Repression and Human Rights

The listing of these papers and publications here in no way implies a connection between the authors and this blog. Nor does it imply that  Political Prisoners in Thailand endorses everything stated in each publication.

The media:

Thailand is mentioned in this release from the International Press Institute on violence against journalists, 4 February 2009, “Asia eclipses Middle East in Violence Against Journalists”

FACT reports on how Thailand’s Ministry of Information and Communication Technology has blocked at least 17,775 web pages and sites and together with the police more than 50,000 web pages and sites are now blocked in Thailand. FACT, 4 January 2009: “FACT releases free, legal circumvention tools”

Human rights:

Human rights issues, the military and the Democrat premier in the Washington Post, 30 January 2009: “New Thai Premier Seen as Leaning Right; Reformists Worry”

Human rights groups in Thailand seem to have taken sides politically, according to The Nation, 28 January 2008: “Human rights defenders split into yellow and red camps”

Andrew Walker, from the Australian National University, comments on the Nicolaides case and broader human rights issues in Thailand: Sydney Morning Herald, 24 January 2009: “Rights Abuse? You Wouldn’t Read About It”

The BBC (23 January 2009) has a useful account of the current human rights issues facing Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva:  “Honeymoon to nightmare for Thai PM”

Rohinga and the military:

New Mandala has a most useful and important commentary on the military commander involved with the Rohinga refugee issue, linking him to the Kru Se massacre in 2004: “Refugee abuse commander’s human right record”. CNN, 25 January 2009has an extensive report, including video: “Thai lawmakers probe refugee abuse” and Bangkok Pundit has extensive commentary over several posts. Amnesty international has made a statement on the Rohinga issue – The Irrawaddy, 30 January 2009: “AI calls for access to Rohinga”. Why does AI refuse to say anything at all about lèse majesté? More background on the Rohinga can be found at ALTSEAN.

Censorship:

FACT reports on how Thailand’s Ministry of Information and Communication Technology has blocked at least 17,775 web pages and sites and together with the police more than 50,000 web pages and sites are now blocked in Thailand. FACT, 4 January 2009: “FACT releases free, legal circumvention tools”

Somchai Neelaphaichit:

PPT  marked the fifth anniversary of the disappearance of Somchai Neelaphaichit in its blog pages. On 12 March 2004, Somchai disappeared following his advocacy for five young men who were tortured after being arrested on national security charges. While his case does not directly relate to lesè majesté, the failure of the Thai state to bring those responsible for his murder to account after five years reflects the broader context of impunity in Thailand.

The Asian Human Rights Commission has forwarded Angkhana Neelaphaichit [coordinator of the Working Group on Justice for Peace as well as Somchai’s widow] statement on the anniversary: 12 March 2009, “Statement on the fifth anniversary of disappearance of lawyer Somchai Neelaphaichit”

In addition, the AHRC has posted a PDF of the English translation of Angkhana Neelaphaichit’s account of her struggle for justice since 2004: Angkhana Neelaphaichit, “Reading Between The Lines”

PPT urges readers to remember that lesè majesté prisoners are part of a broader category of people subject to repression and the manipulation of the law.  Remember Somchai Neelaphaichit.

Phra Supoj Suwaj:

Phra Supoj fought fearlessly against greedy investors hungry to turn his monastery in Chiang Mai’s Fang district into tangerine orchards. The young monk paid for the struggle with his life. His killer has also not yet been brought to account. Remember Phra Supoj Suwaj.

3 responses

21 03 2009
New: New historical documents at PPT « Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] at PPT PPT has been posting historical documents related to lesé majesté, the monarchy, human rights and general items on Thailand’s history and politics. The latest additions are posted with […]

22 10 2010
Kasit on political prisoners and repatriation to Burma « Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] of what is “voluntary” and what is “better” politics. If readers recall the horrendous treatment of Rohinga boat people, the involuntary and forcible repatriation of Hmong to Laos, labeled by the government as somehow […]

5 12 2010
Commentary on the king’s birthday | Political Prisoners in Thailand

[…] PPT suggests not only Handley (noted above) but also the range of papers at our commentary pages, here, here and here. And, of course, the two new books posted on here and […]