Unending lese majeste detention

6 11 2018

Adilur Rahman Khan is the Vice-President of the International Federation for Human Rights or FIDH. He has recently stated:

The detention and prosecution of Siraphop Kornaroot violate his fundamental rights to liberty, freedom of expression, and a fair trial – all rights guaranteed by international treaties to which Thailand is a state party. It is very disturbing that after more than four years there is no end in sight for Siraphop’s trial and the military court, which should not try civilians in the first place, continues to deny him bail.

This statement is in the context of the FIDH and its partner organization, Thai Lawyers for Human Rights having petitioned the United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, seeking the release of lese-majeste defendant Siraphop.

The statement by FIDH observes:

Siraphop, 55, has been detained for more than four years and four months – the longest time for a person currently charged or serving a prison sentence under Article 112. Siraphop was arrested on 1 July 2014 in Bangkok and is currently incarcerated at the Bangkok Remand Prison. Since July 2014, the Bangkok Military Court has rejected Siraphop’s bail applications seven times, the most recent today, 5 November 2018. His trial before the Bangkok Military Court has been ongoing since 24 September 2014.

Also known as Rung Sila, Sirapop has been held for almost 1,600 days without his trial in a military court having been completed.

In petitioning the UN’s Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, FIDH and TLHR called for:

the immediate and unconditional release of Siraphop and for all the charges against him to be dropped. FIDH and TLHR also urge the government to end the abuse of lèse-majesté and immediately and unconditionally release those detained or imprisoned under Article 112 for the mere exercise of their fundamental right to freedom of opinion and expression.

Sirapop has refused to plead guilty. This often leads to not just arbitrariness on the part of the military junta and judiciary, but a vindictiveness that amounts to lese majeste torture.





On the junta’s use of lese majeste

8 05 2017

Reproduced in full from the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), Union for Civil Liberty (UCL) and Internet Law Reform Dialogue (iLaw):

(Bangkok, Paris) The number of individuals arrested on lèse-majesté charges since the May 2014 military coup has passed the 100 mark, FIDH and its member organizations Union for Civil Liberty (UCL) and Internet Law Reform Dialogue (iLaw) said today.

“In less than three years, the military junta has generated a surge in the number of political prisoners detained under lèse-majesté by abusing a draconian law that is inconsistent with Thailand’s international obligations.”

Dimitris Christopoulos, FIDH President

Article 112 of Thailand’s Criminal Code (lèse-majesté) imposes jail terms for those who defame, insult, or threaten the King, the Queen, the Heir to the throne, or the Regent. Persons found guilty of violating Article 112 face prison terms of three to 15 years for each count.

The number of people who have been arrested under Article 112 of the Criminal Code has reached 105, following the arrest of six individuals on 29 April 2017. Forty-nine of them have been sentenced to prison terms of up to 30 years. To date, at least 64 individuals are either imprisoned or detained awaiting trial on lèse-majesté charges. At the time of the 22 May 2014 coup, there were six individuals behind bars under Article 112. Eighty-one of the 105 cases involved deprivation of liberty for the exercise of the right to freedom of opinion and expression. The remaining cases are related to individuals who were arrested for claiming ties to the royal family for personal gain.

“Many of those arrested are democracy activists and outspoken critics of the military regime. In some instances, they were kidnapped from their homes by military officers and interrogated in secret for several days in military camps before being formally charged. Lèse-majesté defendants are rarely granted bail, and so spend months or even years fighting their cases while in detention. All of this makes a mockery of ‘justice’ in Thailand’s justice system.”

Jon Ungpakorn, iLaw Executive Director

On 28 March 2017, following the review of the country’s second periodic report under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) in Geneva, Switzerland, the UN Human Rights Committee (CCPR), expressed concern over the “extreme sentencing practices” for those found guilty of lèse-majesté. The CCPR recommended Thailand review Article 112 to bring it into line with Article 19 of the ICCPR and reiterated that the imprisonment of persons for exercising their freedom of expression violates this provision. The CCPR also demanded the authorities release those who have been deprived of their liberty for exercising their right to freedom of expression.

“The Thai government has run out of excuses to avoid reforming lèse-majesté. Article 112 must be brought into compliance with Thailand’s international obligations as demanded by numerous UN mechanisms.”

Jaturong Boonyarattanasoontorn, UCL Chairman




Drop sedition case and all proceedings against human rights lawyer

3 10 2016

This post from FORUM-ASIA and a statement by a group of human rights groups deserves widespread dissemination:

3 October 2016

The Thai Government should immediately drop all proceedings against human rights lawyer, Sirikan Charoensiri, including the specious accusation of sedition, which apparently relate to her organization’s representation of 14 student activists peacefully protesting in June 2015, the International Commission of Jurists (ICJ), Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA), the Observatory for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders (an FIDH–OMCT partnership), Protection International (PI), Lawyers’ Rights Watch Canada (LRWC), Fortify Rights, and the International Service for Human Rights (ISHR), said today.

On 27 September 2016, Sirikan Charoensiri, a lawyer and documentation specialist at Thai Lawyers for Human Rights (TLHR), received a summons from the Thai Police following accusations that she violated Article 12 of the Head of National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) Order 3/2015, prohibiting the gathering of five or more people for political purposes, and Article 116 of the Thai Criminal Code, a ‘sedition’-type offence. According to the summons, the accusations are made by an army officer, Lieutenant Colonel Pongsarit Pawangkanan.

Sirikan Charoensiri received the summons, dated 20 September 2016, when she returned to Thailand after attending the 33rd Session of the Human Rights Council in Geneva where she conducted advocacy on the human rights situation in Thailand on behalf of FORUM-ASIA and the ICJ. Sirikan Charoensiri did not receive an earlier summons, dated 14 September 2016, the police claimed had been sent to her apartment, as she was not home at the time.

Sirikan Charoensiri has already been charged with two offences under the Criminal Code of Thailand: “giving false information regarding a criminal offence” and “refusing to comply with the order of an official” in relation to TLHR’s provision of legal aid to 14 student activists – the new summons appears to relate to the same case.

International Commission of Jurists:

“The army’s accusation that Sirikan Charoensiri has violated the frequently abused sedition law with its extremely serious penalties and risk of a military trial is indefensible and must be withdrawn immediately,” said Wilder Tayler, Secretary General of the ICJ. “The fact that the authorities have made these accusations more than one year after TLHR’s clients were charged with sedition in the same case suggest the accusations have been made in retaliation for her high-profile national and international human rights advocacy since the military coup.”

Human Rights Watch:

“It’s outrageous that Thai authorities are even considering charging lawyer Sirikan Charoensiri for defending her clients, and it will be doubly so if they haul her before a fundamentally unfair military court,” said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “By seeking to intimidate lawyers who represent government opponents, the Thai junta is showing its deep-seated fear of the rule of law.”

Amnesty International:

“The new accusations against Sirikan Charoensiri once again demonstrate the willingness of Thai authorities to retaliate against lawyers and activists engaging in the important work of defending human rights and the rule of law,” said Rafendi Djamin, Amnesty International’s Director for South East Asia and the Pacific. “The Thai government should reverse course and take seriously its obligation to protect the independence of lawyers and their freedom to defend their clients without fear of retaliation, and to create an environment where all are able to freely and safely speak out about human rights violations.”

Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development:

“Summoning human rights lawyer Sirikan Charoensiri for a sedition-type charge under Article 116 of the Thai Criminal Code is a clear case of retaliation against human rights defenders who advocate for the human rights situation in Thailand after the coup in May 2014,” said Betty Yolanda, the Director of FORUM-ASIA. “If indicted, Sirikan Charoensiri’s legitimate human rights work might be hindered by possible travel restrictions to take part in international human rights advocacy work given that prior permission to travel abroad has to be obtained from the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO).”

FIDH (International Federation for Human Rights):

“The authorities’ ongoing harassment against Sirikan Charoensiri shows that the Thai Government is just paying lip service to its commitment to protect human rights defenders,” said Dimitris Christopoulos, FIDH President.

World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT):

 “The accusations against Sirikan Charoensiri are a blatant and calculated attempt to thwart her legitimate work as a human rights lawyer,” said Gerald Staberock, OMCT Secretary-General. “The crackdown against human rights defenders, including pro-democracy activists, has to stop and all accusations and charges against Sirikan Charoensiri must be immediately dropped.”

Protection International:

“The number of legal cases brought against human rights defenders for reporting and addressing human rights violations is increasing in Thailand, and women human rights defenders are especially at risk,” said Liliana De Marco Coenen, Executive Director of Protection International. “Since the beginning of the year, eight out of the ten
human rights defenders who have been charged with criminal offences are
women.”

Lawyers’ Rights Watch Canada:

“The addition of new accusations against Sirikan Charoensiri is alarming, as they appear to be a reprisal for her work as a lawyer and a human rights defender,” said Gail Davidson, Executive Director of LRWC. “Thailand approved the General Assembly resolution calling on all nations to protect human rights defenders and must now meets its international human rights obligations by ensuring the immediate withdrawal of all accusations against Sirikan Charoensiri.”

Fortify Rights:

“Targeting Sirikan Charoensiri for her legitimate work as a human rights lawyer is yet another attempt by the authorities to foment a climate of fear,” said Amy Smith, Executive Director at Fortify Rights. “Thai authorities should treat human rights defenders as valuable members of society rather than enemies of the state.”

International Service for Human Rights:

“The spurious accusations against human rights lawyer Sirikan Charoensiri should be withdrawn immediately and unconditionally,” said Phil Lynch, Director, International Service for Human Rights. “Thailand has a clear duty to protect human rights defenders under international law and standards and so it is particularly concerning that these accusations may be in retaliation for her human rights advocacy since the military coup.”

Background

The 20 September 2016 summons did not set out any precise grounds for the accusations, but they appear to relate to TLHR’s provision of legal aid to 14 student activists who were arrested on 26 June 2015 after carrying out peaceful protests calling for democracy and an end to military rule.

If ultimately indicted for these alleged offences, Sirikan Charoensiri is likely to face trial in a military court as they appear to pre-date the Head of NCPO’s 12 September 2016 Order 55/2016 phasing out the prosecution of civilians in military courts.

Article 12 of Head of NCPO Order 3/2015 (which prohibits the public assembly of five or more people for political purposes) carries a maximum penalty of six months’ imprisonment or a fine not exceeding 10,000 Thai Baht or both. The ‘sedition’-type offence under Article 116 of the Thai Criminal Code carries a maximum sentence of seven years’ imprisonment.

Head of NCPO Order 3/2015 and Article 116, which impose broadly worded and ambiguous restrictions on the exercise of freedom of expression, freedom of association, and freedom of peaceful assembly violate Thailand’s legal obligations under international human rights law and are inconsistent with basic rule of law and human rights principles. For example, Article 116 criminalises any act carried out “in order to… raise unrest and disaffection amongst the people in a manner likely to cause disturbance in the country.”

The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), to which Thailand is a Party, guarantees the right to peaceful assembly, freedom of expression, freedom of association, and the prohibition of arbitrary arrest or detention.

The UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders affirms the right of everyone to peacefully oppose human rights violations. It prohibits retaliation, threats and other harassment against anyone who takes peaceful action against human rights violations, both within and beyond the exercise of their professional duties.

The UN Basic Principles on the Role of Lawyers provide that governments are to ensure that lawyers are able to perform their professional functions without intimidation, hindrance, harassment or improper interference.

Signed:

International Commission of Jurists (ICJ)
Human Rights Watch
Amnesty International
Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA)
FIDH (International Federation for Human Rights)
World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT)
Protection International
Lawyers’ Rights Watch Canada
Fortify Rights
International Service for Human Rights (ISHR)

——

– คำแปลแถลงการณ์ –

ประเทศไทย: ขอให้ยุติการดำเนินคดีข้อหายุยงปลุกปั่นและกระบวนการทางกฎหมายอื่น ๆ ทั้งหมดกับทนายความด้านสิทธิมนุษยชน “นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ” โดยทันที

วันนี้ (3 ตุลาคม 2559) คณะกรรมการนักนิติศาสตร์สากล (International Commission of Jurists – ICJ) ฮิวแมนไรท์วอทช์ (Human Rights Watch) แอมเนสตี้ อินเตอร์เนชันแนล (Amnesty International) สภาเพื่อสิทธิมนุษยชนและการพัฒนาแห่งเอเซีย (Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development – FORUM-ASIA) กลุ่มสังเกตการณ์เพื่อการคุ้มครองนักปกป้องสิทธิมนุษยชน (Observatory for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders ซึ่งเป็นโครงการความร่วมมือระหว่างสมาพันธ์สิทธิมนุษยชนสากล- FIDH และองค์กรต่อต้านการทารุณกรรมโลก – OMCT) องค์กรโพรเทคชั่นอินเตอร์เนชันแนล (Protection International – PI) องค์กรลอว์เยอร์ไรท์วอชแคนาดา Lawyers Rights Watch Canada (LRWC) องค์กรโฟร์ติไฟย์ไรท์ (Fortify Rights) และองค์กรอินเตอร์เนชั่นแนลเซอร์วิสฟอร์ฮิวแมนไรท์ International Service for Human Rights (ISHR) ขอเรียกร้องให้รัฐบาลไทยยุติการดำเนินคดีทุกคดีกับทนายความด้านสิทธิมนุษยชน “นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ” โดยทันที รวมถึงข้อกล่าวหาที่มิชอบเรื่องยุยงปลุกปั่น ซึ่งเป็นที่ชัดแจ้งว่าเกี่ยวโยงกับการที่องค์กรที่เธอสังกัดเป็นทนายความให้กับนักศึกษา 14 คนที่รวมตัวประท้วงอย่างสงบเมื่อเดือนมิถุนายน พ.ศ. 2558

นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ ทนายความและผู้เชี่ยวชาญด้านข้อมูลของศูนย์ทนายความเพื่อสิทธิมนุษยชน (Thai Lawyers for Human Rights – TLHR) ได้รับหมายเรียกจากเจ้าหน้าที่ตำรวจให้ไปรับทราบข้อกล่าวหาในวันที่ 27 กันยายน พ.ศ. 2559 ภายหลังถูกกล่าวหาว่าฝ่าฝืนคำสั่งหัวหน้าคณะรักษาความสงบแห่งชาติฉบับที่ 3/2558 ข้อ 12 ซึ่งห้ามการชุมนุมทางการเมืองตั้งแต่ห้าคนขึ้นไป และมาตรา 116 ของประมวลกฎหมายอาญาในความผิดประเภท ‘ยุยงปลุกปั่น’ โดยในหมายเรียกระบุชื่อผู้กล่าวหาเป็นเจ้าหน้าที่ทหาร คือ พ.ท. พงศฤทธิ์ ภวังค์คะนันท์

นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริได้รับหมายเรียกลงวันที่ 20 กันยายน พ.ศ. 2559 ภายหลังเดินทางกลับจากเข้าร่วมการประชุมสมัยสามัญที่ 33 ของคณะมนตรีสิทธิมนุษยชนแห่งสหประชาชาติ (Human Rights Council)
ณ นครเจนีวา ซึ่งเธอได้รณรงค์เกี่ยวกับสถานการณ์สิทธิมนุษยชนในประเทศไทยในฐานะตัวแทนของ FORUM-ASIA และ ICJ ก่อนหน้านั้น เจ้าหน้าที่ตำรวจได้ส่งหมายเรียกลงวันที่ 14 กันยายน พ.ศ. 2559 ไปยัง
อพาร์ตเมนต์ของเธอ อย่างไรก็ตาม ความปรากฎว่านางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริไม่ได้รับหมายเรียกเนื่องจากเธอไม่ได้อยู่ที่อพาร์ตเมนต์ในวันดังกล่าว

ก่อนหน้านี้ นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ ถูกตั้งข้อหากระทำความผิดตามประมวลกฎหมายอาญาสองข้อหา คือ “แจ้งความอันเป็นเท็จ” และ “ไม่ปฏิบัติตามคำสั่งของเจ้าพนักงาน”  ซึ่งข้อหาดังกล่าวเชื่อมโยงกับการที่ศูนย์ทนายความเพื่อสิทธิมนุษยชนให้ความช่วยเหลือด้านกฎหมายแก่นักศึกษา 14 คน ทั้งนี้ หมายเรียกฉบับใหม่ดูเหมือนจะเกี่ยวข้องกับคดีเดียวกันนี้

คณะกรรมการนักนิติศาสตร์สากล (International Commission of Jurists – ICJ)

“ข้อกล่าวหาของทางทหารที่ว่า นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ ทำผิดกฎหมายฐานยุยงปลุกปั่นนั้น เป็นฐานความผิดที่มักถูกนำมาใช้โดยมิชอบอยู่บ่อยครั้ง โดยเป็นบทกฎหมายที่มีบทลงโทษที่รุนแรงอย่างสุดโต่ง นอกจากนี้ยังมีความเสี่ยงที่คดีของ นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ จะอยู่ภายใต้การพิจารณาคดีในศาลทหาร ซึ่งเป็นสิ่งที่หลีกเลี่ยงไม่ได้และจะต้องถอนข้อหาดังกล่าวทันที” นายวิลเดอร์ เทย์เลอร์ (Wilder Tayler) เลขาธิการ ICJ กล่าว “ข้อเท็จจริงที่ว่าทางการตั้งข้อหาดังกล่าวเป็นเวลากว่าหนึ่งปี ภายหลังที่ลูกความของศูนย์ทนายความเพื่อสิทธิมนุษยชนถูกตั้งข้อหายุยงปลุกปั่นในคดีเดียวกัน แสดงให้เห็นว่าข้อกล่าวหาดังกล่าวเป็นการโต้กลับกับการที่ตั้งแต่ภายหลังรัฐประหารเป็นต้นมา เธอได้ทำงานรณรงค์เรื่องสิทธิมนุษยชน โดยได้รับความสนใจอย่างสูงทั้งในระดับชาติและระดับนานาชาติ”

ฮิวแมนไรท์วอทช์ (Human Rights Watch)

“เป็นเรื่องที่เหลือทนที่ทางการไทยกำลังพิจารณาตั้งข้อหาทนายความ ศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ เหตุเพราะ
ทำหน้าที่ปกป้องลูกความของเธอ และเป็นเรื่องที่แย่ลงไปอีกเท่าตัวหากว่าทางการนำตัวเธอขึ้นสู่ศาลทหารซึ่งไร้ความเป็นธรรมโดยพื้นฐานอยู่แล้ว” นายแบรด อดัมส์ (Brad Adams) ผู้อำนวยการภาคพื้นเอเซียของ Human Rights Watch กล่าว “การพยายามข่มขู่ทนายความผู้ทำหน้าที่แก้ต่างให้กับฝ่ายตรงข้ามรัฐบาลกำลังแสดงให้เห็นว่าฝ่ายทหารมีความกลัวอย่างฝังลึกต่อหลักนิติธรรม”

แอมเนสตี้ อินเตอร์เนชันแนล (Amnesty International)

“การตั้งข้อหาใหม่กับ นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ อีกครั้งแสดงถึงความตั้งใจของทางการไทยที่จะ
โต้กลับทนายความและนักกิจกรรมที่มีส่วนเกี่ยวข้องกับงานสำคัญของการพิทักษ์สิทธิมนุษยชนและหลัก
นิติธรรม” นายราเฟนดิ ดีจามิน (Rafendi Djamin) ผู้อำนวยการภาคพื้นเอเซียตะวันออกเฉียงใต้และแปซิฟิกของ Amnesty International กล่าว “รัฐบาลไทยควรเปลี่ยนแนวคิดดังกล่าวและปฏิบัติตามพันธกรณีของตนอย่างจริงจังเพื่อคุ้มครองความเป็นอิสระของทนายความและเสรีภาพของพวกเขาในการทำหน้าที่แก้ต่างให้ลูกความโดยปราศจากความกลัวว่าจะถูกแก้แค้น และเพื่อสร้างบรรยากาศที่ทุกคนสามารถพูดถึงการละเมิดสิทธิมนุษยชนได้อย่างเสรีและปลอดภัย”

สภาเพื่อสิทธิมนุษยชนและการพัฒนาแห่งเอเซีย (Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development – FORUM-ASIA)

“การออกหมายเรียกทนายความสิทธิมนุษยชน นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ ด้วยข้อหาประเภทยุยงปลุกปั่นภายใต้มาตรา 116 ของประมวลกฎหมายอาญาเป็นกรณีที่ชัดเจนว่าเป็นการตอบโต้นักปกป้องสิทธิมนุษยชน
ผู้รณรงค์เรื่องสถานการณ์สิทธิมนุษยชนในประเทศไทยภายหลังการรัฐประหารเมื่อเดือนพฤษภาคม พ.ศ. 2557” เบตตี้ โยลานดา (Betty Yolanda) ผู้อำนวยการ FORUM-ASIA กล่าว “หากถูกดำเนินคดี งานรณรงค์ด้าน
สิทธิมนุษยชนอันชอบธรรมของ นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริอาจถูกปิดกั้นด้วยการจำกัดไม่ให้เดินทางไปเข้าร่วมกิจกรรมรณรงค์ระหว่างประเทศว่าด้วยเรื่องสิทธิมนุษยชน เนื่องจากเงื่อนไขที่จะต้องได้รับอนุญาตจากคณะรักษาความสงบแห่งชาติ (คสช.) เพื่อให้สามารถเดินทางออกนอกประเทศ”

สมาพันธ์สิทธิมนุษยชนสากล (International Federation for Human Rights – FIDH)

“การที่รัฐบาลคุกคามนางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริอย่างต่อเนื่อง แสดงให้เห็นว่ารัฐบาลไทย มีเพียงลมปากว่าจะทำตามพันธสัญญาที่จะคุ้มครองนักปกป้องสิทธิมนุษยชน” นายดิมิตริส คริสโตปูลอส (Dimitris Christopoulos) ประธาน FIDH กล่าว

องค์กรต่อต้านการทารุณกรรมโลก (World Organisation Against Torture – OMCT)

“ข้อกล่าวหาต่อนางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริเป็นความพยายามอย่างโจ่งแจ้งและไตร่ตรองไว้ก่อนแล้วที่จะทำลายการปฏิบัติหน้าที่ทนายความสิทธิมนุษยชนอันชอบธรรมของเธอ” นายเจอรัลด์ สตาเบร็อค (Gerald Staberock) เลขาธิการ OMCT กล่าว “การปราบปรามนักปกป้องสิทธิมนุษยชนรวมถึงนักต่อสู้เพื่อประชาธิปไตยอย่างรุนแรงจะต้องยุติลงและต้องยกเลิกข้อกล่าวหาทั้งปวงต่อนางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ โดยทันที”

องค์กรโพรเทคชั่นอินเตอร์เนชันแนล (Protection International – PI)

“การดำเนินคดีกับนักปกป้องสิทธิมนุษยชนด้วยเหตุของการรายงานและกล่าวถึงการละเมิดสิทธิมนุษยชนกำลังเพิ่มจำนวนขึ้นในประเทศไทย และนักปกป้องสิทธิมนุษยชนที่เป็นผู้หญิงจะตกอยู่ในความเสี่ยงเป็นพิเศษ” ลิเลียนา เดอ มาร์โค โคเนน (Liliana De Marco Coenen) ผู้อำนวยการ PI กล่าว “ตั้งแต่ต้นปีที่ผ่านมา 8 ใน 10 คนของนักปกป้องสิทธิมนุษยชนที่ถูกตั้งข้อหาความผิดทางอาญาเป็นผู้หญิง”

องค์กรลอว์เยอร์ไรท์วอชแคนาดา (Lawyers Rights Watch Canada – LRWC)

“การเพิ่มข้อกล่าวหาใหม่กับนางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริเป็นเรื่องที่น่าตระหนก เพราะดูเหมือนว่าเป็นปฏิบัติการตอบโต้การทำงานของเธอในฐานะทนายความและนักปกป้องสิทธิมนุษยชน” เกล เดวิดสัน (Gail Davidson) ผู้อำนวยการ LRWC กล่าว “ประเทศไทยได้รับรองมติของที่ประชุมแห่งสมัชชาสหประชาชาติซึ่งเรียกร้องให้ทุกชาติคุ้มครองนักปกป้องสิทธิมนุษยชน บัดนี้ ประเทศไทยจะต้องอนุวัติการพันธกรณีระหว่างประเทศว่าด้วยสิทธิมนุษยชนโดยดำเนินการถอนข้อกล่าวหาทั้งหมดต่อ นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ”

องค์กรโฟร์ติไฟย์ไรท์ (Fortify Rights)

“การมุ่งเป้าไปที่ นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ เนื่องมาจากการทำหน้าที่ทนายความสิทธิมนุษยชนอันชอบธรรมของเธอเป็นความพยายามอีกครั้งของทางการไทยที่จะกระตุ้นให้เกิดบรรยากาศของความหวาดกลัว” เอมี่ สมิธ (Amy Smith) ผู้อำนวยการ Fortify Rights กล่าว “ทางการไทยควรปฏิบัติต่อนักปกป้องสิทธิมนุษยชนเสมือนเป็นสมาชิกผู้มีคุณค่าของสังคมแทนที่จะเป็นศัตรูของรัฐ”

องค์กรอินเตอร์เนชั่นแนลเซอร์วิสฟอร์ฮิวแมนไรท์ (International Service for Human Rights – ISHR)

“ข้อกล่าวหาเท็จต่อทนายความสิทธิมนุษยชน นางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริ ควรถูกถอนทันทีโดยปราศจากเงื่อนไข” นายฟิล ลินช์ (Phil Lynch) ผู้อำนวยการ ISHR กล่าว “ประเทศไทยมีหน้าที่ชัดเจนที่จะคุ้มครองนักปกป้องสิทธิมนุษยชนตามกฎหมายและมาตรฐานระหว่างประเทศ ดังนั้นจึงเป็นเรื่องน่ากังวลอย่างยิ่งที่ข้อกล่าวหาเหล่านี้อาจเป็นการตอบโต้งานรณรงค์สิทธิมนุษยชนที่เธอดำเนินการมาตั้งแต่ภายหลังรัฐประหาร”

ความเป็นมา

หมายเรียกลงวันที่ 20 กันยายน พ.ศ. 2559 มิได้ระบุมูลเหตุแน่นอนของข้อกล่าวหา แต่ดูเหมือนว่าหมายเรียกดังกล่าวจะเชื่อมโยงกับการที่ศูนย์ทนายความเพื่อสิทธิมนุษยชนให้ความช่วยเหลือด้านกฎหมายแก่นักศึกษา 14 คนซึ่งถูกจับกุมเมื่อวันที่ 26 มิถุนายน พ.ศ. 2558 หลังจากชุมนุมประท้วงอย่างสงบเพื่อเรียกร้องประชาธิปไตยและยกเลิกการปกครองโดยฝ่ายทหาร

หากท้ายที่สุดนางสาวศิริกาญจน์ เจริญศิริถูกดำเนินคดีด้วยความผิดตามที่กล่าวหา เป็นไปได้ว่าคดีของเธอจะอยู่ภายใต้การพิจารณาของศาลทหาร เพราะความผิดตามข้อกล่าวหาเหล่านี้เกิดขึ้นก่อนคำสั่งฉบับที่ 55/2559 ของหัวหน้า คสช. เมื่อวันที่ 12 กันยายน พ.ศ. 2559 ซึ่งยกเลิกการฟ้องคดีพลเรือนต่อศาลทหาร

ข้อ 12 ในคำสั่งหัวหน้าคสช. ฉบับที่ 3/2558 (ซึ่งห้ามการชุมนุมทางการเมืองตั้งแต่ห้าคนขึ้นไป) กำหนดบทลงโทษสูงสุดจำคุกหกเดือนหรือโทษปรับเป็นเงินไม่เกิน 10,000 บาท หรือทั้งจำทั้งปรับ ความผิดประเภท ‘ยุยงปลุกปั่น’ ตามมาตรา 116 ของประมวลกฎหมายอาญากำหนดโทษสูงสุดจำคุกเจ็ดปี

ทั้งคำสั่งหัวหน้า คสช.ฉบับที่ 3/2558 และมาตรา 116 กำหนดข้อจำกัดด้วยคำที่กินความกว้างและกำกวมเกี่ยวกับการใช้เสรีภาพในการแสดงออก เสรีภาพในการสมาคม และเสรีภาพในการชุมนุมโดยสงบ ซึ่งล้วนละเมิดพันธกรณีด้านกฎหมายของประเทศไทยภายใต้กฎหมายสิทธิมนุษยชนระหว่างประเทศ อีกทั้งยังแย้งกับหลักนิติธรรมและหลักสิทธิมนุษยชน ยกตัวอย่างเช่น มาตรา 116 กำหนดให้การกระทำใดๆ อันเป็นการ “เพื่อ…ให้เกิดความปั่นป่วนหรือกระด้างกระเดื่องในหมู่ประชาชนถึงขนาดที่จะก่อความไม่สงบขึ้นในราชอาณาจักร” เป็นความผิดทางอาญา

กติการะหว่างประเทศว่าด้วยสิทธิพลเมืองและสิทธิทางการเมือง (International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights – ICCPR) ซึ่งประเทศไทยเป็นภาคี ให้หลักประกันสิทธิในการชุมนุมโดยสงบ เสรีภาพในการแสดงออก เสรีภาพในการสมาคม และการห้ามมิให้จับกุมหรือคุมขังโดยพลการ

ปฏิญญาสหประชาชาติว่าด้วยนักปกป้องสิทธิมนุษยชน (UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders) ยืนยันสิทธิของคนทุกคนที่จะคัดค้านการละเมิดสิทธิมนุษยชนด้วยหนทางสันติ ปฏิญญาฯห้ามมิให้กระทำการ
โต้กลับ ข่มขู่และคุกคามด้วยรูปแบบอื่นๆ ต่อบุคคลใดก็ตามที่กระทำการโดยสันติเพื่อต่อต้านการละเมิดสิทธิมนุษยชน ไม่ว่าจะในระหว่างหรือนอกเหนือจากการปฏิบัติหน้าที่ตามวิชาชีพของพวกเขา

หลักการพื้นฐานขององค์การสหประชาชาติว่าด้วยบทบาทของทนายความ (UN Basic Principles on the Role of Lawyers) กำหนดให้รัฐบาลให้ความมั่นใจว่าทนายความจะสามารถปฏิบัติหน้าที่ตามวิชาชีพของพวกเขาโดยปราศจากการข่มขู่ ขัดขวาง คุกคามหรือแทรกแซงอย่างไม่ถูกต้องเหมาะสม

ลงชื่อ

คณะกรรมการนักนิติศาสตร์สากล (International Commission of Jurists – ICJ)
ฮิวแมนไรท์วอทช์ (Human Rights Watch)
แอมเนสตี้ อินเตอร์เนชันแนล (Amnesty International)
สภาเพื่อสิทธิมนุษยชนและการพัฒนาแห่งเอเซีย (Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development – FORUM-ASIA)
5. สมาพันธ์สิทธิมนุษยชนสากล (International Federation for Human Rights – FIDH)
6. องค์กรต่อต้านการทารุณกรรมโลก (World Organisation Against Torture – OMCT)
7. องค์กรโพรเทคชั่น อินเตอร์เนชันแนล (Protection International – PI)
องค์กรลอว์เยอร์ไรท์วอชแคนาดา (Lawyers Rights Watch Canada – LRWC)
องค์กรโฟร์ติไฟย์ไรท์ (Fortify Rights)
องค์กรอินเตอร์เนชั่นแนลเซอร์วิสฟอร์ฮิวแมนไรท์ (International Service for Human Rights (ISHR)





Updated: Thailand rejected at the UN

29 06 2016

Kazakstan does not look very much like a democratic polity. Yet it is not a military dictatorship. As the Bangkok Post has it, Kazakstan “easily defeated Thailand’s bid for a non-permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council, with just 55 countries backing Thailand against 138 for Kazakhstan.”

Junta supporters have pointed to the 55 and drawn some cockeyed notion about support for the regime, but that glass isn’t even half full.

Earlier, some of Thailand’s diplomats were quoted as declaring that “[m]ilitary-ruled Thailand stands a ‘good chance’ over oil-rich Kazakhstan…”. We couldn’t help wondering if these were the same shoppers diplomats who lied to the UN Human Rights Council. That these diplomats reckoned it was “a 50:50 draw, but we stand a good chance as we have secured support from Washington among others…” is another example of how the junta’s Thailand is Bizarro World, where its inhabitants are in some kind of delusional state or parallel political universe.

We also wondered if The Dictator’s self-described diatribe to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon might have sunk a very leaky Thai ship in the UN.

In the end, the “second-round voting wasn’t close.”

For more background on this event, see Kavi Chongkittavorn’s propaganda-like piece in support if the junta’s bid for the UNSC seat and the opposition of Human Rights Watch and FIDH (International Federation for Human Rights) opposition.

Update: Despite all of the junta hype before the devastating defeat, and in the face of statements that the “Thai bid delegation, comprising former Asean secretary-general [and Democrat Party stalwart] Surin Pitsuwan and other retired ambassadors, had been optimistic about winning the race,…” Deputy Dictator General Prawit Wongsuwan has commented that: “We had anticipated that…. Never mind. Next time.” Prawit sounds as if he will still be around “next time” in 2017-18. Meanwhile, according to the same Bangkok Post report states that the “Pheu Thai Party claimed Wednesday the country spent more than 600 million baht in a campaign leading up to Thailand’s defeat in the race for a non-permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council (UNSC).”





New FIDH report on lese majeste

26 02 2016

112FIDH, the International Federation for Human Rights, has released an important report on lese majeste under the military junta.

Titled 36 and counting – Lèse-majesté imprisonment under Thailand’s military junta, the report details arrests, detentions and convictions under Article 112 since the junta grabbed power in May 2014.

The press release states that the report:

raises serious concerns over the pattern of violations of the right to liberty, the right to a fair trial, and the right to freedom of opinion and expression stemming from prosecutions under Article 112 of the Criminal Code (lèse-majesté). These violations are in breach of Thailand’s obligations under key international human rights instruments.





FIDH on lese majeste and the military dictatorship

21 05 2015

We are re-posting this important statement in full. It is from the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH):

Thailand: Unprecedented number of lèse-majesté detentions call for urgent reform of Article 112

Paris, Bangkok, 20 May 2015: In the first 12 months under the rule of the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO), Thailand experienced an unprecedented number of lèse-majesté detentions, FIDH and its member organization Union for Civil Liberty (UCL) said today.

“Unless the NCPO promotes an urgent reform of Thailand’s lèse-majesté law, Thai jails will be increasingly populated by individuals who have merely exercised their fundamental rights to freedom of opinion and expression,” said FIDH President Karim Lahidji.

According to research conducted by FIDH, since the junta seized power on 22 May 2014, at least 47 individuals have been detained under the draconian Article 112 of the Criminal Code. [1] Eighteen people have been sentenced to prison terms ranging from one to 50 years, for a combined total of 159 years – an average of eight years and eight months each. In most cases, defendants saw their sentences halved because they pleaded guilty to the charges.

Article 112 of the Thai Criminal Code states that “whoever defames, insults or threatens the King, the Queen, the Heir to the throne or the Regent shall be punished with imprisonment of three to 15 years.”

Prosecutions under Article 112 are likely to continue at a steady pace in the coming months. On 24 April 2015, police said that there were 204 active lèse-majesté cases, of which 128 were under investigation. Authorities are also set to target lèse-majesté suspects beyond Thailand’s national borders. On 21 March 2015, junta-appointed Minister of Justice Gen Paiboon Koomchaya said the military-backed government would seek the extradition of 30 Thais living in exile who have been charged under Article 112.

FIDH and UCL urge the authorities to end lèse-majesté prosecutions of individuals who exercise their fundamental rights to freedom of opinion and expression. The two organizations also urge the authorities to immediately and unconditionally release all individuals imprisoned under Article 112 for having exercised their rights to freedom of opinion and expression.

“Protection of the monarchy must not impinge on the rights of individuals to freedom of opinion and expression. It’s time for the NCPO to heed the numerous UN recommendations for reform and bring Article 112 in line with international law,” urged UCL Chairman Jaturong Boonyarattanasoontorn.

Various UN human rights bodies have repeatedly called on Thailand to amend Article 112 and ensure that it complies with the country’s obligations under international human rights treaties, such as the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), to which Thailand is a state party. In the latest statement by a UN official, on 1 April 2015, UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression David Kaye expressed concern over the increasing arrests and detentions under Article 112 and called for an end to the criminalization of dissenting opinions.

Press contacts:
FIDH: Mr. Arthur Manet (French, English, Spanish) – Tel: +33 6 72 28 42 94 (Paris)
UCL: Mr. Jaturong Boonyarattanasoontorn (Thai, English) – Tel: +66890571755 (Bangkok)

[1] This number does not include individuals who have been detained under Article 112 in connection with the prosecution of relatives of former Princess Srirasmi





Judicial harassment

13 03 2015

Thailand under the sway of royalism – and that goes back to the late 1950s – and under military rule has succeeded in destroying the justice system. As in previous military dictatorships, the law becomes an instrument of the state and is used to repress. The International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH) has issued an Urgent Appeal related to the activities of lawyer Arnon Nampa and his harassment by the military dictatorship via its flunkies in the so-called justice system:

The Observatory has been informed by reliable sources about the judicial harassment against Mr. Anon Nampa, a volunteer lawyer with the organization Thai Lawyers for Human Rights (TLHR). TLHR was established by a group of lawyers in May 2014 to provide legal assistance to alleged lèse-majesté violators and activists targeted by the authorities following the 22 May military coup. Although in existence for less than a year, TLHR received a human rights award by the French Embassy in Bangkok in December 2014. Besides his work for TLHR, Mr. Anon has defended numerous individuals accused of lèse-majesté under Article 112 of the Criminal Code or under the provisions of the Computer Crimes Act since 2010.

URGENT APPEAL – THE OBSERVATORY

THA 001 / 0315 / OBS 017
Judicial harassment
Thailand
March 12, 2015

The Observatory for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders, a joint programme of the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH) and the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT), requests your urgent intervention in the following situation in Thailand.

Description of the situation :

The Observatory has been informed by reliable sources about the judicial harassment against Mr. Anon Nampa, a volunteer lawyer with the organization Thai Lawyers for Human Rights (TLHR). TLHR was established by a group of lawyers in May 2014 to provide legal assistance to alleged lèse-majesté violators and activists targeted by the authorities following the 22 May military coup. Although in existence for less than a year, TLHR received a human rights award by the French Embassy in Bangkok in December 2014. Besides his work for TLHR, Mr. Anon has defended numerous individuals accused of lèse-majesté under Article 112 of the Criminal Code or under the provisions of the Computer Crimes Act since 2010.

According to the information received, on March 5, 2015, Mr. Anon reported to the Pathumwan police station in Bangkok to respond to a complaint filed by Lt Col Burin Thongprapai, an official at the Judge Advocate General’s Department, on February 25, 2015. Lt Col Burin accused Mr. Anon of “importing into a computer false information which may damage national security” under Article 14(2) of the Computer Crimes Act for posting five Facebook messages that criticized the role of the military in the administration of justice under martial law. If prosecuted and found guilty, Mr. Anon faces up to 25 years in jail and a fine of up to 500,000 Thai baht (approximately 14,135 Euros).

Mr. Anon posted the five messages on Facebook while in police custody on February 14, 2015. On that day, police arrested Mr. Anon, along with three anti-coup activists, on charges of violating National Council for Peace and Order’s (NCPO’s) order No. 7/2014, which prohibits public gatherings of more than five people. The four were arrested while they were in the process of organizing an event at the Bangkok Cultural and Art Center to mark the one-year anniversary of the annulled Thai general election on February 2, 2014. All four were released on bail after being detained and interrogated for more than nine hours at the Pathumwan police station.

The Observatory strongly condemns the judicial harassment against Mr. Anon Nampa, which only aims at sanctioning his legitimate human rights activities. The Observatory calls on Thai authorities to drop all charges held against him and put an immediate end to this judicial harassment.

Actions requested :

Please write to the authorities of Thailand asking them to :

i. Drop all charges against Mr. Anon Nampa and put an end to all acts of judicial harassment against him and all human rights defenders in Thailand ;

ii. Guarantee in all circumstances the physical and psychological integrity of Mr. Anon,as well as all human rights defenders in Thailand ;

iii. Conform with the provisions of the UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders, adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on December 9, 1998, especially its Article 1, which states that “everyone has the right, individually and in association with others, to promote and to strive for the protection and realisation of human rights and fundamental freedoms at the national and international levels”, and Article 12.2, which provides that “the State shall take all necessary measures to ensure the protection by the competent authorities of everyone, individually and in association with others, against any violence, threats, retaliation, de facto or de jure adverse discrimination, pressure or any other arbitrary action as a consequence of his or her legitimate exercise of the rights referred to in the present Declaration” ;

iv. Ensure in all circumstances respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms in accordance with international human rights standards and international instruments ratified by Thailand.

Addresses :

Prime Minister, Gen Prayuth Chan-ocha, Government House, 1, Phitsanulok Road, Dusit, 10300, Bangkok, THAILAND ; Fax : +66 (0) 2282 5131
Minister of Interior, Gen Anupong Paochinda, Asatang Road, Ratchabophit, 10200, Bangkok, THAILAND

Minister of Foreign Affairs, Gen Tanasak Patimapragorn, Sri Ayutthaya Building, 443 Sri Ayutthaya Road, Phaya Thai, 10400, Bangkok, THAILAND ; T Fax : +66 (0) 2 643-5320 ; E-mail : minister@mfa.go.th

Minister of Justice, Gen Paiboon Khumchaya, 120, Chaeng Watthana Road, Laksi, 10210, Bangkok, THAILAND ; Fax : +66 (0) 2 953-0503

Pol Gen Somyot Poompanmoung, Commissioner-General of the Royal Thai Police, 1st Building, 7th Floor, Rama I Road, Pathumwan, 10330, Bangkok, THAILAND ; Fax : +66 (0) 2 251 5956 / +66 (0) 2 251 8702

Ms. Amara Pongsapich ; Chairperson of the National Human Rights Commission of Thailand ; 120, Chaeng Watthana Road, Laksi, 10210, Bangkok, THAILAND ; E-mail : help@nhrc.or.th

Permanent Mission of Thailand to the United Nations in Geneva, rue Gustave Moynier 5, 1202 Geneva, Switzerland, Tel : + 41 22 715 10 10 ; Fax : + 41 22 715 10 00 / 10 02 ; Email : mission.thailand@ties.itu.int

Embassy of Thailand in Brussels, 2 Sq. du Val de la Cambre, 1050 Ixelles, Belgium, Tel : + 32 2 640.68.10 ; Fax : + 32 2 .648.30.66. Email : thaibxl@pophost.eunet.be

Please also write to the diplomatic mission or embassy of Thailand in your respective country

***
Paris-Geneva, March 12, 2015

Kindly inform us of any action undertaken quoting the code of this appeal in your reply.

The Observatory, a FIDH and OMCT venture, is dedicated to the protection of Human Rights Defenders and aims to offer them concrete support in their time of need.