With several updates: Royalists, recycling and ratbag rightists

31 08 2020

Watching the ultra-royalist Thai Pakdee group “rally” on Sunday was reminiscent of some of the People’s Democratic Reform Committee events. There was some yellow, some whistles, old head and arm bands, and the white, flag-themed t-shirts all seemed recycled from Suthep Thaugsuban’s efforts to overthrow an elected government and/or provide the political space for a military coup.

Thai PBS reports that mostly aged royalists rallied in support of the absent monarch and the junta’s constitution and to demand strong legal measures against student and pro-democracy activists. It was a full bag of rightist demands, recycled from earlier movements going back to the People’s Alliance for Democracy and the military-backed rightists of earlier decades.

Former Democrat Party member, former Action Coalition for Thailand member, and long-term yellow shirt Warong Dechgitvigrom led the rally, and denied he planned and “confrontation” with rallying students and other pro-democracy groups. He did not say that his assigned task is to rally support from the right and royalists and to provide a potential base for further military-backed intervention, should that be deemed necessary by the powers that watch over him and his ilk.

Like his predecessors, Warong blamed all of Thailand’s “troubles” on “politicians,” accusing them of “plunging Thailand into deeper political divide, separating the old and new generations.”

His claim was that his ragtag ratbags had:

come together to protect the [m]onarchy, to retain the Thai identity, to do away with all forms of monopoly, to attain career equality for all Thai people, through the application of technology, and to enhance national prosperity via a sufficiency economy.

He also called for the “Education Minister and all university rectors” repress the student-based activism by not allowing space for rallies and to stop “lecturers, who may harbor anti-[m]onarchy leanings, from ‘brainwashing’ their students.” In this, he is recycling rightism from the 1970s.

In addition, Thai Pakdee planned to recycle rightist demands on the Japanese Embassy to stop Pavin Chachavalpongpun criticizing the monarchy.

The United Front for Democracy against Dictatorship’s Jatuporn Promphan, who has sounded rather royalist of late, said Thai Pakdee had “an extreme right-wing agenda, similar to a combination of the former Nawaphol, Red Guard and Village Scout groups.” We are not sure how Red Guards get into the mix, but his reference to Thai rightist heritage is apt.

The recycling of rightists and their rhetoric is dangerous, often leading to the unexplained/uninvestigated bashing of regime critics, probably by rightists working with the authorities.

It is dangerous also for regime and monarchy critics who live in exile. Rightist rhetoric gives cover and justification for the several enforced disappearances in Laos and Cambodia. These are very likely black ops by the Thai military operating on orders from the regime and the palace.

These acts of violence have been meant as “warnings” to anti-regime and anti-monarchists, to instill fear and to silence them.

Getting away with abduction, torture and murder in “brother authoritarian” regimes is relatively easily arranged, often a quid pro quo for similar operations by those regimes in Thailand.

Clipped from Thai Alliance for Human Rights website

But it seems that this is not enough. The regime’s panic about anti-monarchy exiles in Japan, the USA and Europe is heightened, probably provoked by recent activism targeting the king in Germany.

The Nation reports on recent efforts to threaten those overseas based critics. Jom Petpradap, a “journalist living in exile in the United States has accused the Thai government of making veiled threats to his life and safety.” He has received a “package sent to him from Thailand [that] contained threatening materials” that made it clear that he is under surveillance and being followed.

Other exiles and outspoken monarchy critic Andrew MacGregor Marshall have reported similar packages and/or stalking.

Rightists in Thailand are also recycling Alt-Right inspired propaganda.

Thisrupt has a limited report on this development, noting that these conspiracy-based “revelations” of “plots” against the right’s Thailand mirror efforts in the 1970s to link student movements to international communism and efforts to overthrow the monarchy.

Something called “Thailand Vision” has been claiming a “plot,” backed by the USA – claimed to be promoting a “color revolution” in Thailand – and funded by Thai and international billionaires and capitalists. Like racists and rightists elsewhere, George Soros is identified as one of the culprit. Soros is remembered by Thai rightists as a culprit in the 1997 economic crisis. But his real “crime” is support for liberal causes.

In an elaborate concoction, Thailand Vision actually recycles claims made in earlier years by a self-exiled American, yellow-shirted conspiracy theorist who has been writing for one of Russia’s propaganda outfit, the New Eastern Outlook, which provides links to a range of alternative media sites, some of them anti-Semitic, others climate change deniers and many libertarian. Some of the co-authors have links to the extreme right in the U.S., including Lyndon LeRouche. and with connections to Alex Jones and much of the anti-imperialist alt-right.

In earlier times, it was Thaksin Shinawatra who was the “culprit” in motivating the international liberal/globalist conspiracy to bring down the monarchy. Now it is Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit and international capitalists “behind” NGOs and international “co-conspirators” like the German newspaper Bild (for its tabloid journalism n the king in Germany), Business Insider, PixelHELPER, Freedom House, Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and even Netflix!

In Thailand, “co-conspirators” include almost all of the NGOs and other organizations that are not rightist and sufficiently royalist, including the Foreign Correspondents Club of Thailand, Thai Volunteer Service, Asian Network for Free Elections Foundation (ANFREL), Union for Civil Liberty, Prachatai, 101.world and The Isaan Record.

This might all sound bizarre, but in the recent past, such conspiracy nonsense has gained traction among former leftist yellow shirts like the late Kraisak Choonhavan and the regime/junta.

Recycling propaganda is about promoting notions of “threat” and mobilizing rightist reaction.

Update 1: We missed a Khaosod story about the ultras on Sunday. As well as one rally speaker – the youngest – seeming to incite violence and, later, calling for military dictatorship, coupled with a “Down with Democracy” screech, “speakers dish[ed] out conspiracy theories that implicate the governments of the United States and other Western countries in the ongoing anti-government protests.” Celebrity Hatai Muangboonsri said onstage: “Western powers want us to be divided. They encouraged a mindset that hates the pillars of our country…”. The reaction from the US Embassy was predictable. There’s also a strain of pro-China agitation from the ultras, who have mostly opposed Hong Kong democracy protesters.

Update 2: Two stories at The Nation deserve some attention. The first is about a street sweeper attacked outside the Thai Pakdee rally at the Thai-Japanese Stadium in Din Daeng. He was allegedly beaten up “because he was wearing a red shirt.” The story states: “It is assumed that the guard of Thai Pakdee royalist group may have assumed that Sukhon [the man beaten] had worn red to show he was associated with the anti-coup red-shirt movement.” The second story is a most unconvincing “denial” by Warong. Yellow social media is denigrating the cleaner as a “red buffalo” who got what he deserved as a Thaksin supporter. Fascism is on the march.

Update 3: In another story at The Nation, Student Union of Thailand spokesperson Panusaya “Rung” Sithijirawattanakul insisted that the only people “behind” the student protests were the students themselves. She was logical in pointing out that the use of social media to raise political awareness among students and the young generation means that the students have a lot of supporters: “It wakes up many people. There are a lot of people who think like us.” She added: “It is human nature that if we know that many people share our views, then we have the courage to speak out … our fear is lessened…”. She added that she doesn’t even know all of the groups who associate themselves with Free People. Unlike Russian-paid trolls and yellow-shirted dolts, she’s brave, smart and appears (rather too) innocent.

Update 4: We added a link to Update 1 and corrected a point there.

Update 5: The Nation reports that Warong has “denied that the 15-year-old who posted a message on Facebook Live encouraging dictatorship was a member of his group.” He declared:  “he is not our member. I don’t know. Go ask him. He’s just a kid”.

Clipped from Khaosod

As the above picture shows, Warong is dissembling. He’s shown pulling a Thai Pakdee shirt over the lad’s yellow shirt. He’s applauded and lauded. Warong is trying to mislead people because he doesn’t want Thai Pakdee portrayed as it really is: an undemocratic, pro-military, pro monarchy mob that promotes the dictatorship.





Updated: PixelHELPER protests against Vajiralongkorn

25 05 2020

Readers will recall the PixelHELPER illuminations protest against King Vajiralongkorn in Germany. We have really only posted on one of these protests in Germany. There have been more, chronicled at Andrew MacGregor Marshall’s Facebook page (also see campaign page below).

An interview with their founder is now available thanks to exiled journalist Jom Petpradap:

There’s more on PixelHELPER here.

Update: The PixelHelper campaign page on King Vajiralongkorn has information and a donation page,





Further updated: What is the rumor?

17 12 2014

The Bangkok Post reports that the “Stock Exchange of Thailand says it found no irregularities in Monday’s stock plunge as battered Thai shares Tuesday extended their six-day skid” of about 10% since 8 December. It cites several possible contributing factors and then states “[a]n undisclosed local rumour and the tumbling oil price prompted the selling spree.”

In fact, the undisclosed is disclosed. Prachatai, citing the ultra-royalist ASTV, states the:

Thai junta on Tuesday accused a Thai journalist living in self-exile of spreading rumours about the Thai King’s health, which caused the Stock Exchange of Thailand to plunge dramatically on Monday.

Maj Gen Sansern Kaewkamnerd, Army and government spokesman, said the rumour about the King’s health was spread by Jom Petpradab, a veteran journalist now living in self-exile in the US.

In fact, PPT hasn’t followed Job, but we were also pretty sure that the SET trading was due to two things: that the king is so unwell that he is unable to operate; and related, that the succession has begun. Several of our recent posts about the “royal divorce” have indicated our guesses about this.

Because the media is so opaque and self-censoring on these things it is difficult to find evidence that is in any way solid. However, it seems pretty clear to us that the prince is preparing for his reign. That might be a cause for the sell-off as much as claims that the king is dead (or just resting).

Update 1: Another take on the rumors is provided by the Bangkok Post’s reporter assigned to the military, Wassana Nanuam, who claims several domestic rumors: General Chavalit Yongchaiyudh talking about a possible “counter-coup”; that the military dictatorship “might invalidate 1,000-baht banknotes in a bid to wipe out corrupt politicians and officials who keep all their money in cash”; an “internal conflict within the NCPO and between the NCPO and the ‘old powers’, a reference to soldiers loyal to Privy Council president Gen Prem Tinsulanonda”; and, finally, although it is not quite stated as a rumor, “concern about His Majesty the King’s health…”.

Update 2: Prachatai has a story citing journalist Jom Petpradab mentioned above. He is reported to have issued “a statement released on Wednesday [stating] that he was very upset and worried with the allegation from the junta that he spreaded [sic.] the rumour which caused the biggest single-day loss in six years at the Stock Exchange of Thailand (SET).” He said that the story, “The inside story of the divorce between the Crown Prince and Mom Srirasmi,” which was published on Thai Voice Media website on 13 December 2014, “was initiated because he noticed that most of the public have sympathy for the former royal consort, so he intended to correct the popular misunderstanding about the divorce.” He states that he had “high level sources in the palace.” One of those sources stated that the “divorce” was done in “preparation for the succession. The source also speculated that the succession will take place during the military regime.”





More on Jom Petpradap and media freedom

13 09 2009

The Nation (13 September 2009: “Fearless amid the fury”) has an interesting feature on Jom Petpradap, who was the journalist who did the controversial live interview with former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra on 6 September on MCOT. PTT recently posted on his response to the Democrat Party’s chief censor Sathit Wongnongtoey here. PPT’s earlier post on the interview is here. We recommend this article in The Nation for the details on the case and Jom’s earlier brushes with authorities that prefer to censor the media.





Jom Petpradab’s statement on media freedom

11 09 2009

Prachatai (11 September 2009) has produced Jom Petpradab’s statement ( in some reports his name is rendered Chom Phetoradab) on media freedom and the threats posed. Jom is the journalist who did the live interview with former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra on 6 September on MCOT. He begins: “Thai media, freedom of speech, and freedom to information are under threat in Thailand by a government that is robbing the people of their rights and freedoms.”

Well worth reading in full.

PPT’s earlier post on this case is here, where we comment on the Democrat Party and its minister Sathit Wongnongtoey and their determination to keep the media under control.