Thai Broadcast Journalists’ Association and double standards

6 03 2010

The Bangkok Post (5 March 2010) has a short note regarding alleged intimidation a red shirt blacklist of 53 people, which includes several journalists.” The Association’s President Korkhet Chanthalertlak said the association had yet to discuss measures to be taken in retaliation for the blacklist but noted it was the first time that members of media outlets had been harassed or intimidated.

We at PPT have no idea whether Korkhet has been misquoted, but if he is quoted correctly, we would have thought that he’d at least try to get his facts straight. Both red and yellow shirt protests have involved threats to journalists. ASTV/Manager was the subject of a grenade attack. The People’s Alliance for Democracy attacked and occupied a government broadcaster, PAD illegally detained journalists and threatened journalists during the occupation of the airports, and red shirts have been reported as briefly detaining a journalist at a rally. In addition, the Abhisit Vejjajiva government repeatedly threatens red shirt community radio.

The Association claimed the threats were at a “website of army specialist Khattiya Sawasdipol, has released a list of 53 people in various professions who have been blacklisted.” PPT visited the website but could find no such threats posted. If any reader saw these threats and the listed names, please email us.

On blacklists, PPT would also think that journalists should be a little more even-handed and might have suggested that alleged blacklists are not the sole preserve of the red shirts and that the government might also be taken to task for its alleged role in developing a blacklist of red shirts. In the past, though, the major journalism associations were strongly controlled by royalists and were, for example, heavily supportive of PAD.








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