Lese majeste torture for the monarch

18 05 2022

As we have posted several times over several years, the judiciary and regime have co-operated to make the lives of those charged with lese majeste as difficult as possible. Indeed, so vicious has this been that we consider it amounts to lese majeste torture, with judges, prosecutors, and jailers united in “protecting” the monarchy. In other words, they torture for the king.

The most recent example of the vicious decision-making that keeps a person accused under Article 112 locked up involves Tantawan Tuatulanon. This 20 year-old is considered a dangerous threat to one of the world’s most powerful monarchs simply because she questions his some of the privileges he’s accrued.

Thai PBS reports that her most recent bail application, yesterday, was rejected. The Criminal Court dismissed Move Forward Party Leader Pita Limjaroenrat’s offer as the guarantor for bail “because Pita’s MP pay slip was not submitted with the application.” The court required “a pay slip to prove he [Pita] receives a salary…”. Yes, seriously. Obviously, the court intends to punish and seeks any loophole to continue to deny bail.

The political court also said “there were no other special reasons to grant bail.” Political prisoners in Thailand are treated as “evil” and not deserving of the bail that is usually provided to murderers, rapists, and torturers.

Pita actually did submit “a letter of certification of his salary issued by the Office of the Secretary-General of the Parliament, as a bond for the bail of Tantawan…”. But the court apparently wanted the pay slip. Yes, seriously.

Police opposed bail, saying they were still investigating. The court “granted permission for the police to detain the accused for only five more days, pending further investigation.”





Brave and proud

15 05 2022

Prachatai states:

In a new surge of detentions, six people are in jail in connection with the royal defamation law – five of them denied bail to contest the charges outside prison. A human rights lawyer said the move illustrates the authorities’ obsession with smothering any public criticism of the monarchy.

Add to that obsession the absurdity of the Lazada stuff, where it is the royalists who identify that it is about one of The Munsters royal family they think is being portrayed and, once having outed the royal family then rushes to “protect” it.

In among all of that, we find another political prisoners on a hunger strike. Tantawan Tuatulanon is one of the brave kids bringing attention to absurd, obsessional monarchism among some. She began her hunger strike a day after she was sent to jail on 20 April. Watch this Prachatai video about her and her protests:





Vajay and lese majeste IV

11 02 2022

This is the fourth and final post about this NFT creation that is meant to raise awareness of lese majeste. There are more artworks at the site.

We don’t know much about this stuff, but we thought readers may be interested to see some of the art. We are not promoting sales.

The anonymous artist describes this scene:

“Vajay Plays With His Lego Set of Thailand” is 8/9 in a collection titled “Vajay’s 112 Dystopia,” to raise awareness of Section 112 of Thailand’s Criminal Code. Owning, viewing, sharing, or discussion of this art means a 15 year prison sentence for each instance. Meaning, the creator expects a sentence of at least 135 years. Floor price is high to bait the government into buying the series to burn it and keep crushing dissent. So…buy it, share it and enjoy prison you degenerates!!!





Vajay and lese majeste III

9 02 2022

This is the third post about this NFT creation that is meant to raise awareness of lese majeste.

We don’t know much about this stuff, but we thought readers may be interested to see some of the art. We are not promoting sales.

The anonymous artist describes their third portrait this way:

“Vajay’s Happy Place” is 3/9 in a collection titled “Vajay’s 112 Dystopia,” to raise awareness of Section 112 of Thailand’s Criminal Code. Owning, viewing, sharing, or discussion of this art means a 15 year prison sentence for each instance. Meaning, the creator expects a sentence of at least 135 years. Floor price is high to bait the government into buying the series to burn it and keep crushing dissent. So…buy it, share it and enjoy prison you degenerates!!!





Middle-fingering 112 and the establishment

8 02 2022

Defying Decay made headlines with their “blistering track about Thailand’s royal insult [law].” According to Coconuts Bangkok, the group, which has just finished a tour of the USA is “on its way home to set fire to a Bangkok stage.”

There are hopes that the band will “play The Law 112: Secrecy and Renegades, the band’s latest single calling out abuse of the lese majeste law among a set list that puts injustice center stage.”

The planned 12 February gig has “five other acts including electronic-pop artist Pyra, metalcore quintet Annalynn, melodic hardcore band Carry On, shoegaze Telever, and alt-metal musicians Conductor.” As Coconuts has it, “Even the name of the gig is a middle finger at the establishment: One Twelve End of Era.

The show begins at 3pm at Lido Connect. Tickets are THB517 and can be reserved online.





Vajay and lese majeste II

5 02 2022

This is the second NFT creation that is meant to raise awareness of lese majeste.

We don’t know much about this stuff, but we thought readers may be interested to see some of the art. We are not promoting sales.

The anonymous artist describes their second scene this way:

“Vajay’s Outdoor Nappypoo” is 5/9 in a collection titled “Vajay’s 112 Dystopia,” to raise awareness of Section 112 of Thailand’s Criminal Code. Owning, viewing, sharing, or discussion of this art means a 15 year prison sentence for each instance. Meaning, the creator expects a sentence of at least 135 years. Floor price is high to bait the government into buying the series to burn it and keep crushing dissent. So…buy it, share it and enjoy prison you degenerates!!!





Vajay and lese majeste I

2 02 2022

In an effort to raise awareness of lese majeste, an anonymous artist has created a SolSea account. SolSea promotes itself as “the first open NFT marketplace on Solana with integrated minting. It also introduces NFTs with embedded licenses and Rarity rank, supports wallet funding with FTX-Pay and Moonpay, and is regularly updated with new features.”

We don’t know much about this stuff, but we thought readers may be interested to see some of the art. We are not promoting sales.

The artists describes their second portrait this way:

“Jaunty Vajay_hits_the_streets” is 2/9 in a collection titled “Vajay’s 112 Dystopia,” to raise awareness of Section 112 of Thailand’s Criminal Code. Owning, viewing, sharing, or discussion of this art means a 15 year prison sentence for each instance. Meaning, the creator expects a sentence of at least 135 years. Floor price is high to bait the government into buying the series to burn it and keep crushing dissent. So…buy it, share it and enjoy prison you degenerates!!!





Intimidate, repress, and control II

30 01 2022

The repression of heavy suppression of protesters and activists has been intense. Thai Lawyers for Human Rights recently published a report that states “at least 1,747 people in 980 cases have been prosecuted due to political protests and expression since the Free Youth Rally on 18 July 2020 until 25 December 2021.”

Only 150 of these cases have been concluded, meaning that hundreds of people are tied up in various legal procedures or are being held without bail. This reflects the regime’s use of lawfare.

In 2021 alone, “1,513 new people in 835 cases have been politically accused, accounting for an almost 7-fold increase compared to the number in the second half of 2020.”

Notably, there was a sharp rise in arrests and prosecutions “during the three-month period between August to October. The period coincided with a heightened political tension as a result of car mob events in various provinces, almost daily protests by various groups in Bangkok, and series of “Talu-Gas” protests at Din Daeng Intersection and the surrounding areas.”

Lese majeste charges were filed against at least 127 “new” people in 104 cases, while sedition charges were filed against at least 55 “new” people in 16 cases. As for the “key political leaders accused between 18 July 2020 and 25 December 2021 …[TLHR] found that:

Parit “Penguin” Chiwarak has 43 cases.

Panupong “Mike” Jadnok has 30 cases.

Anon Nampa has 24 cases.

Panusaya “Rung” Sithijirawattanakul has 24 cases.

Jatupat “Pai” Boonpattararaksa has 19 cases.

Benja Apan has 19 cases.

Another TLHR report states that “at least 291 activists and citizens, 39 of whom concerned youths under 18 years old, received house visits or were summoned for talks by authorities. These numbers do not include cases where authorities went to deliver summon warrants or make an arrest as part of a prosecution.” Most of this surveillance was in the northeast.

The repression continues and deepens.





Royalist regime fighting for the past

24 01 2022

While not a new revelation,

He explains:

Self-crowned

On a recent visit to a cinema in Bangkok, I was reminded of the dual role that movie theaters play in Thailand. One, of course, is to show films, local and foreign. The other is to reinforce in the audience a belief that their monarch serves as a unifying pillar in the Southeast Asian kingdom. That lesson plays out just before the main feature, when the screen in the darkened auditorium displays a message requesting the audience to stand as the strains of the king’s anthem fill the hall, accompanied by images of the king’s achievements….

The response of audiences — standing up for the anthem — was almost universal until the death of King Bhumibol Adulyadej in late 2016 ended a 70-year reign.

We think this is something of an overstatement. We recall that in the mid-1970s, when the royal stuff came on at the end of the film, many bolted for the exits to escape the hagiographic kitsch. By the late 1990s and early 2000s, audiences at movies and concerts often waited outside until the royal propaganda was finished and then rushed to their seats. But back to the story today:

But something quite different is now going on in cinemas….

[A]t Siam Paragon, a high-end mall in Bangkok’s upmarket shopping district…, [w]hen the familiar request to stand flashed across the screen to the strains of the royal anthem, only a middle-aged Thai couple stood up. The rest of the audience, which mostly consisted of younger Thais, sat impassively through the entire anthem as if it were perfectly normal.

… The display of silent defiance has gathered momentum in recent months; it has been noted by many Thais on social media and is discussed openly….

For the moment, the government appears at a loss on how to respond to this discreet but public challenge to the cinema reverence ritual. Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha, the ex-army chief and former junta leader, has appealed to young people not to give in to peer pressure.

Yet, Thai cinemas have emerged as a new frontier for a generational zeitgeist. They have given a decisive answer to the question of whether or not to stand, something that seemed inconceivable just two years ago. From this perspective, Thai cinemas provide an inflection point in which the simple act of going to the movies becomes a political statement.

The royalist response to this anti-monarchism – or at least the rejection of the palace propaganda – is deepening. As they have for many years, it is the regime and the military are taking the lead.

Former red shirt, now paid turncoat, Seksakol/Suporn Atthawong, a vice minister attached to the Office of Prime Minister continues his boss’s conspiracy theory-inspired campaign against NGOs. Amnesty International is his main target. He claims – and it is a lie – that “NGOs that are supporting the three-hoof mob [he means the 3-finger salute] to destroy the country’s stability and abolish the royal institution…”. He means the monarchy.

He salivates over the AI target:

Amnesty International is an illicit organization that must be held accountable for its actions, and must be prosecuted to the fullest…. We should not give in to organizations that undermine national security.

Here, by national security, he means the monarchy. What did happen to his lese majeste charge? Oh, yes, he sold himself to the military rightists.

As in so many other places struggling with authoritarianism,

Seksakol’s gambit is typical of Thai ultra-royalist fringe politics. But as his position in the prime minister’s office attests, the fringe has migrated gradually to the center and the top of the Thai governing establishment since the military coup led by Prayut 2014. Facing a legitimacy deficit, Prayut’s current military-backed administration (direct military rule technically ended with the holding of a flawed election in 2019) has relied heavily on the blunt force of Thailand’s controversial lese majeste law, which outlaws any critical comment about the king or the monarchy, to silence critics and quash protests.

The regime is planning to stay. Forget all of the parliamentary realigning. This is about maintaining the political status quo well into the future through another rigged election. And just to help it along, the regime has extended its state of emergency. Thailand has been under this kind of draconian control for most of the period since the 2014 coup. This situation allows the military, police, ISOC and the judiciary to keep a lid on anti-royalism.

How it deals with the more passive rejection of the monarchy and the regime requires more propaganda, more surveillance and more repression. It means keeping Thailand in its past and rejecting the future. All in the name of the monarchy.





More 112 indictments

23 01 2022

UCA News reports on the raid on Same Sky publishing, concluding: “Thai authorities appear to be stepping up their campaign against pro-democracy activists, especially those who are advocating monarchy reform…” adding that “[t]his week alone, police have launched crackdowns including [the] raid on [Same Sky] and the issuing of new indictments for royal defamation.”

An anonymous commentator is quoted: “This is what repressive regimes do — try to outlaw honest and open debate…”.

Clipped from Prachatai

On the lese majeste indictments, it reports:

On Jan. 18, police in the northern city of Chiang Mai charged two university students with violating the royal defamation law, which prohibits any criticism of the monarchy and prescribes up to 15 years in prison per charge.

The two students at Chiang Mai University were indicted over an artwork they exhibited last year at the university’s gallery depicting the Thai national flag with the blue stripe, which represents the monarchy, absent in the tricolor, according to the Thai Lawyers for Human Rights group.

In their artwork the two students also condemned the royal defamation law, which is Article 112 of the Criminal Code, by using an expletive.

Another anonymous comment: “More political prisoners? More lives and voices stifled?”








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