20 years to “international democracy”

4 09 2016

The Dictator intends to “prepare Thailand to become a democracy under international standards.”

In a recent report at The Nation, General Prayuth Chan-ocha is quoted as declaring that his military dictatorship’s “20-year national strategic plan was necessary” for such a political outcome.

It is unclear to PPT that The Dictator has any adequate notion of democracy. Later, confirming his odd understanding, Prayuth is quoted as referring to Thailand becoming “an international democracy.”

The plan, which may have begun after the coup in 2014, “would serve as the foundation and pillars in rebuilding the country for the future.”

In fact, he means 20 years of military tutelage in “preparation” for his “international democracy.”

General Prayuth insisted “that the new government to be formed after the next election would follow the strategic plan laid out by his administration, although it was unlikely to be implemented in its entirety.”

Prayuth insisted Thailand is not ready for democracy.

He was speaking on “national and military strategies for the 20-year period from 2017 at the National Defence College.” His audience were “students” from the “National Defence College, Joint Staff College, Royal Thai Army War College, Naval War College, and Air War College.”

These are the people who consider that they run Thailand better than its people can and so have limited popular sovereignty for decades and when it is in place have undermined it.

Sounding king-like or just like a royal parrot, Prayuth declared: “We all know well what the problem is, and its cause, but we can’t work together due to a lack of unity…”.





The fight is against republicans

14 06 2010

Just in case you were wondering what the real fight has been about, a seminar on national security at the National Defence College has been reminded.

The TAN Network reports that the meeting of security officials and academics was told “a movement to overthrow the Monarchy exists in Thailand, supported by former communists and advocates of a presidential system.” These comments came from Senator Suthep Suksa-nguan, a former policeman and appointed to the Senate as a representative of the state sector in 2008.  At the time, The Nation reported on appointed senators: “An NLA source, who asked not to be named, said the selected senators were seen as the Council for National Security’s representatives and supporters to balance the Samak government’s power…”.

Suthep claimed that there “are two major groups that support the anti-monarchy movement. He said one group are former members of the communist movement and the other are those who want to install a presidential system.” He added that these “groups will employ various strategies to undermine the people’s loyalty to the Monarchy, create rumors to tarnish the image of the royal institution or misinform the public.”

So maybe this is going to be a “line” from the royalists for a while. After all, they seem to have managed to convince one senior U.S. senator of it. Such a line will also be used for further censorship and repression.

Suthep doesn’t think more than 10% of the population are disloyal to the monarchy, so presumably that small percentage can be hunted down and repressed.

Speaking during a seminar on national security at the National Defence College, Senator Police Major General Suthep Suksa-nguan said there are two major groups that support the anti-monarchy movement.

He said one group are former members of the communist movement and the other are those who want to install a presidential system.

Suthep said those groups will employ various strategies to undermine the people’s loyalty to the Monarchy, create rumors to tarnish the image of the royal institution or misinform the public.

However, he believes the groups are still unable to archive their goal as more than 90 percent of the Thai people remain loyal to the Monarchy.








%d bloggers like this: