Threatening Penguin

9 06 2021

To get bail, Penguin – Parit Chiwarak – had to give the court certain undertakings that prevent him from questioning the monarchy and engaging in political protest. The regime and its pliant judiciary considered they have worked a fix that keeps the protesters quiet and compliant.

As would be expected from this repressive regime and its royalist vigilantes, they been patrolling Penguin’s social media.

Thai PBS reports that the “parents of Ratsadon anti-establishment protest leader … Penguin … and a Thammasat University lecturer were warned by the Criminal Court today (Monday) that it may revoke the anti-establishment [anti-monarchy] political activist’s bail if he is found to be in breach of his bail terms.”

They were “summoned as Parit’s caretakers to the Court today for a special hearing over a complaint in which Parit is accused of posting a message on his Facebook page deemed to be a breach of the terms of his release on bail…”.

During the hearing, “caretaker” Dr. Adisorn Juntrasook explained that Parit was “just exercising of his freedom of expression within the terms of the bail.” Parit’s “parents also explained that their son did not do anything which could be considered a breach of the bail terms.” Adisorn promised “to remind Parit to comply strictly with the court’s requirements.”

The court “instructed them to make sure that Parit strictly follows the bail terms and refrains from posting any messages on social media which may constitute a violation, or the court may revoke his bail.”

No anti-regime or anti-monarchy language will be tolerated.





Targeting Penguin

15 05 2021

Readers will probably have noticed that the recently bailed Penguin is in the sights of Palang Pracharath Party member Sonthiya Sawasdee.

On Friday, the execrable Sonthiya “asked the Criminal Court to review its decision to free Parit … Chiwarak on bail after the protest leader was accused of violating his bail conditions in a social media post.”

Sonthiya petitioned “Sitthichote Intharawiset, the Criminal Court chief justice, asking the judge to look into the post and decide on the matter.”

It seems this is the brave and challenging post, translated by Thisrupt:

Penguin

Clipped from Prachatai

The 93-day imprisonment and 57-day hunger strike to protest against injustice are now over. Yesterday, the court returned my and Ammy’s right to receive bail, even if there are some bail conditions. It’s self-evident these conditions are meant to obstruct the struggle for democracy. I believe the court is political, and the court must examine whether it stands for justice. In any case, there is now a legal precedent on the right to bail in Article 112 cases. In the past, bail was never granted. Also, I believe this barbaric law should be abolished soon.

I have no issues with the bail conditions because I don’t see how I commit royal defamation. I don’t think there’s defamation when the people speak the truth, whether it’s the demand to abolish Article 112, the request to return royal assets (such as SCB shares), or the call to cancel personal royal armed forces. I don’t see how these things defame the royal institution. If the call for the king to be under the constitution is defamation, then the question becomes: is Thailand a democracy with the king as the head of state or an absolute monarchy?

As such, for me, the struggle for monarchy reform continues.

Regarding the condition barring me from participating in protests that lead to social chaos, I insist I have always upheld peaceful resistance throughout my struggle. Every protest I participated in or organized has been peaceful and without weapons. There have only been nonpeaceful actions by the authorities and government supporters as far as I can see. Therefore, this condition is not an obstacle in my struggle. I am ready to participate in every activity after the current COVID crisis (which occurred because of government incompetence) has passed.

The struggle for democracy continues with strength and conviction. Our struggle is built on the foundation of truth. There is no power greater than truth. Like the stars, truth never dies. No matter which corner of the sky, the stars shine bright, just as the truth. No matter the cage, the torture chamber, or the execution chamber, the truth remains powerful and eternal.

In the immediate step, we must help release others who speak the truth that remains unjustly imprisoned: Lawyer Anon, Brother Mike Rayong, Frank, Natchanon, and others. We who love democracy must continue our struggle to prove speaking the truth is not wrong; lies cannot forever hide the truth.

I am still who I am. I still have faith in the truth. No one can turn back the clock, and soon the wind of change will sweep us into the other side of the sky.

For now, I must rest my body and eat before I march again with my brothers and sisters. I am the same person. I fight for the same ideals. I am more resolute than ever before.

Death to feudalism. Long live the people.

Penguin Parit Chiwarak

12 May 2021 (1 day after freedom)





Penguin and Ammy bailed

12 05 2021

Prachatai reports the good news that the Criminal Court approved bail requests for activist Parit Chiwarak – Penguin – and singer Chaiamorn Kaewwiboonpan – Ammy the Bottom Blues.

The court issued a press release stating that:

Penguin and Rung

Parit with Panusaya in an earlier photo. Clipped from The Nation

the pair were released on Tuesday on a security of 400,000 baht for Parit and 250,000 baht for Chaiamorn on condition that they report to the court as assigned, they do not commit, or attend any activity that may cause public disorder or damage the institution of the monarchy, and they do not travel abroad without the court’s permission.

According to the report:

Parit’s bail security covered in equal amounts 2 cases from his participation in the protests on 19 September 2020 and 14-15 November 2020. 200,000 baht of the security for Chaiamorn covered the 19 September protest and 50,000 baht covered the case of setting fire to the King’s portrait at Klong Prem Prison.

Bail was granted at 18.20, some three hours after the court finished its hearing of the applications for Chaiamorn and Parit. Such delays continue to suggest that the courts are taking orders from elsewhere.

Ammy

An earlier photo of Ammy

Parit has been in pre-trial detention “for 92 days before being released on bail at the tenth attempt.” He had been on a hunger strike for 57 days, protesting the refusal of bail.

Chaiamorn had been detained for 69 days and released on his eighth bail application.

Penguin was released from the prison hospital. Prior to that “police officers from Mueang Roi Et Police Station showed up to arrest him on another charge. The lawyers managed to secure 200,000-baht police bail.”

In addition to the charges on which he bailed, Parit faces at least another 20 more lese majeste charges.





Further updated: “Justice” kills

6 05 2021

There’s increasing concern about hunger strikers and political prisoners Parit “Penguin” Chiwarak and Panusaya “Rung” Sithijirawattanakul, including well-meaning calls from some for them to not die when seeking justice.

Sadly, it is becoming clear that the regime is callous and savage. More, we know that the king has a say in whether the lese majeste is used or not. We also know that he is savage in dealing with those he thinks have been disrespectful – look at how he has treated his various wives and Vajiralongkorn’s mad and furious tone in his official declarations when he sacks people.

It gets worse. It is now confirmed that another political prisoner, Arnon Nampa, has fallen ill with the Covid virus “and been moved for medical treatment” at the Medical Correctional Institution. The virus appears to be infecting many inmates and may be out of control.

Coronation 1

Arnon is the second political prisoner to have contracted the virus while incarcerated. The first was Chukiat “Justin” Saengwong.

All prisoners are now under threat, but that these political prisoners are at risk is yet another example of the politicization and monarchization of the (in)justice system. After all, the junta’s constitution states at Article 29:

A suspect or defendant in a criminal case shall be presumed innocent, and before the passing of a final judgment convicting a person of having committed an offence, such person shall not be treated as a convict.

In lese majeste cases, there is a presumption of guilt.

The question must be asked again and again: why is that these activists are not receiving justice? What is it or who is it preventing justice? WHo is it who doesn not care if they die? Who is it that relishes this savage and feudal treatment of young Thais?

No wonder hundreds of thousands of young Thais have joined a Facebook group that displays their dismay and that they have lost faith in many of the country’s institutions.

The military, the mafia regime, and the monarchy are destroying the country while they and their friends eat it.

Update1 : Some good news: “The Criminal Court has approved bail for the temporary release of Rassadon co-leader Panusaya ‘Rung’ Sithijirawattanakul on condition that she must not get involved in activities deemed to dishonour the monarchy.” Who knows what the latter condition means.In addition, “she must not join any activity that may cause unrest in the country, leave the country without permission and must report to the court as scheduled.”

The court appeared unable to make a decision without getting advice-cum-orders from on high: “After an inquiry into her bail request on Thursday morning, the court first scheduled handing down the decision at 3pm but later rescheduled it twice to 4pm and 5pm.” We take that delay as confirmation that the court gets it order from the regime and/or the palace.

Update 2: Despite the virus outbreak in prisons and at least two political prisoners already infected, Parit Chiwarak has been transferred “from Ramathibodi Hospital back to prison … after his health improved.” The danger to him is made clear by the courts themselves, which refuse to hear these defendants for fear of the virus. Parit’s court appearance, and that for Chaiamorn Kaewwiboonpan, have been postponed “because the two defendants will not complete their 14-day quarantine until tomorrow. Prison officials said both have to be screened again, to make sure they are clear of the virus, before they will be allowed to attend the hearing.” This amounts to protecting judges and other officials – which is reasonable – but keeping political prisoners in dangerous conditions.





Bail protests

3 05 2021

Frustration, sadness, and anger are common responses to the repeated denial of bail for protest leaders, most of them charged with political “crimes.” The continued use of the lese majeste law to silence political protest and the repeated use – over many years – of a cadre of “lock-them-up” judges who take orders from higher authorities heightens those emotions.

On Sunday, all of these emotions were on display, heightened by the political prisoner Parit’s mother displaying her frustration and deep sadness:

Sureerat Chiwarak … shaved her head yesterday (30 April) to protest against the court’s decision to repeatedly deny bail for her son, whose health is reported to be rapidly declining after being on a hunger strike for the past 46 days.

She’s begging for her son to be bailed.

One result of the callous and savage actions of the military-monarchy regime was the frustration of:

Hundreds of Thai protesters hurled red paint, tomatoes and eggs at a Bangkok court Sunday, demanding the release of all political detainees, including an activist who was hospitalised after a hunger strike.

The protesters rallied outside “Bangkok’s Criminal Court to demand Penguin’s release — and that of other detained activists involved in the pro-democracy movement,” demanding justice and not the rubbish dished out by the regime:

They sloshed red paint all over the court’s entrance, where they had plastered posters of the judge who protesters believed had denied Penguin’s bail.

Protesters also hurled eggs and tomatoes into the compound as police stood guard with plastic riot shields.

Meanwhile, long-time anti-coup and labor rights activist Patchanee Khamnak, who joined the rally “began a hunger strike in front of the Bangkok’s Ratchadapisek Criminal Court at 4pm on Sunday, demanding release on bail of all anti-establishment Ratsadon leaders and followers indicted on lèse majesté charges and being held on remand.”

Protesters also rallied at the Victory Monument, where they railed against politicized judges.

The police responded with more of the same. They made arrests, “dispersed” protesters, lied about the actions of protesters and promised more arrests.





Callous and savage

30 04 2021

While not unexpected, the report by Prachatai that the Criminal Court has again denied bail for seven activists detained on lese majeste charges is to be lamented as yet another demonstration that the judicial system is deeply flawed.

These political prisoners are Panupong Jadnok, Parit “Penguin” Chiwarak, Panusaya Sithijirawattanakul, Chaiamorn Kaewwiboonpan, Arnon Nampa, Chukiat Saengwong and Parinya Cheewinkulpahtom.

Penguin and Rung

Clipped from The Nation

Parit has now been detained for more than 80 days. He remains on a partial hunger strike that began some 45 days ago to protest the injustice of the system and the denial of bail for detained activists.

Lawyer Kritsadang Nutcharat of Thai Lawyers for Human Rights said:

…one of the reasons for requesting bail is concern over the spread of Covid-19 in prisons, because even the court is concerned that the virus will spread among court officials. He also said that there is no more reason to keep the activists in detention, and that it would be acceptable if the court set a condition related with their trial. He also mentioned that the court previously granted bail for activists Jatupat Boonpattaraksa and Somyot Pruksakasemsuk.

Kritsadang expressed considerable concern for Penguin and “also requested that the court allow Parit to be taken to Rama 9 Hospital for 30 days, because the hospital is better equipped than the Medical Correctional Institution…”.

The court demonstrated its inhumanity by dismissing the request. It is as though the courts take their orders from savage and vindictive higher-ups.

Kritsadang revealed that:

he visited Parit on 28 April and spoke to him through teleconference. During the visit, Parit told Kritsadang that he has not been able to sleep, his skin is dry, and that he suffers from nausea and fatigue. Blood was also found in his stools, but he has not been sent to the Medical Correctional Institution to have his condition assessed.

The court exhibited a callous disregard for the detainee’s health.

Meanwhile the “Department of Corrections has denied that Parit’s condition has worsened…”.

The ruling to deny bail was “signed by judge Tawan Rodcharoen. Judge Tawan delivered the verdict in the Joe Gordon lèse majesté case in 2011.” Joe had repeated bail requests denied. When he finally agreed to plead guilty and he was sentenced to 5 years.

The Bangkok Post reports that the Corrections Department has said that Parit is “physically well.” It quotes Department deputy director-general Thawatchai Chaiwat from Thursday, stating that “Parit could talk and was well and conscious. He was tired and had dry lips, but was not dizzy.” Thawatchai added that Panusaya who is also rejecting “food and took only drinking water, minerals, juice and milk,” is also “well, conscious, looked normal, talked understandably and was able to do her routines…”.

The lie in this is demonstrated. Parit is now hospitalized. The very same Corrections Department now states that Parit “was admitted over concerns he could go into shock if his condition worsened and require specialised care.”

TLHR warns that both Parit and Panusaya “are in deteriorating health…”.

Parit faces 20 lese majeste charges “which could result in a sentence of 300 years.” Meanwhile, “Panusaya faces nine cases under the law, which could lead to a 135-year sentence if convicted.”





Free Penguin and Rung

26 04 2021

Tyrell Haberkorn and Thongchai Winichakul of the University of Wisconsin-Madison have a call for the release on bail of political prisoners Parit “Penguin” Chiwarak and Panusaya “Rung” Sithijirawattanakul. It is at NikkeiAsia. Read it in full.

Clipped from The Nation

The two have “gone on hunger strike while being detained ahead of their trials in late May for alleged lese-majeste. The pair are refusing nourishment to protest the denial of their right to bail.”

Penguin began his partial hunger strike on 15 March 15 and Rung joined him 15 days later: “The risk to their health grows with each passing day.”

The authors note:

…these activists have not actually insulted, defamed, or threatened the monarchy. Instead, they have dared to call for an open and frank discussion on the place of the monarchy in Thailand — particularly with respect to its relationship with the law, the judiciary, the military and its assets.

Parit faces at least 20 counts of violating Article 112, and Panusaya at least nine. Their sentences for speeches at peaceful protests and social media posts could break records — evidence how afraid the state and the palace are of such discussions.

They point out that the “right to bail is guaranteed under Thai law and by Thailand’s international human rights obligations, but it is routinely denied in Article 112 cases on the grounds of national security and the fact that the harsh penalty makes flight more likely.” By denying bail, they say,the regime “has effectively shut down the protest movement, and instilled fear in those who dare to dissent.” And, authoritarianism deepens.

They conclude:

As each application for bail is denied, it becomes more evident that preventing citizens from openly discussing the monarchy and its role in the Thai polity are to the authorities more important than the lives of citizens. Parit, Panusaya and all the other political detainees must have their bail rights restored.





Another poem from prison

22 04 2021

A couple of days ago we posted a poem by political prisoner Parit Chiwarak, known as Penguin. Ann Norman has now sent us a second, more recent Penguin poem:

บทอาศิรวาทถวายแด่ประชาชนผู้สร้างชาติ

Verses of Blessings Offered to the Citizens, People who Create the Nation

ในโอกาสวันจักรี

On the Occasion of Chakri Day

วันที่ 6 เมษายน 2564

April 6, 2021

 

กรุงเทพเทพเสกได้ เองฤา

Can Krungtep be created by the magic spell of an angel?

ล้วนแต่ตีนแต่มือ ไพร่สร้าง

All the feet, all the hands . . . commoners create and build

เวียงวังวัดสะพรั่งคือ ใครก่อ ขึ้นนา

The towns, royal palaces, and temples in blossom, who built them up?

ใยเทพฉวยชื่ออ้าง ว่าตั้ง กรุงเอง

Why does the angel snatch the name, claiming he built it himself?

 

ปราสาททองอร่ามเรื้อง เรืองสมัย

Golden palaces glitter and gleam for ages

ทองรีบเร้นจนใคร ขื่นกล้ำ

The gold was seized until someone is bitter

โอ้ว่าทิพยาลัย สรวงสถิตย์

The palaces where monarchs lived

งามวิสิทธิ์วิเศษล้ำ ก็น้ำตาใคร

Magnificently and splendidly built on whose tears?

 

เหงื่อไพร่พรูพรั่งพื้น พสุธา

The sweat of commoners pouring to the ground

ข้าวจึงเหลืองเต็มนา ทั่วด้าว

The rice therefore fully yellows the fields throughout the territory

ใช่โพสพเทวดา ใดเสก ประทานแฮ

Not the Goddess of Rice casting a spell, granting [it]

ผองไพร่ไป่ปลูกข้าว ฤาเจ้า มีเสวย

If the farmers don’t farm rice, will the monarchs have rice to eat?

 

เลือดใครไหลหลั่งป้อง ปฐพิน

Who shed blood to protect the motherland?

เลือดแน่เลือดไพร่ริน พิภพกว้าง

Certainly the blood of commoners flows [across] the wide world

เลือดดินย่อมย้อมดิน แดงเดือดค

The blood of the land is likely stain the ground red

ใช่เลือดบนหลังช้าง ที่ล้าง ธรณี

It’s not the blood [of the one] on the back of the elephant that washes the Earth

 

บุญแรงราษฎร์หล่อเลี้ยง โลกา

The virtue and power of the citizens nourishes the world

เป็นหลักค้ำผืนนภา แผ่นหล้า

It’s a principle that holds up the sky and the land [that is, the country]

เหลือยิ่งเอกบุญญา มหาราช ใดเลย

Even greater than the principle and merit of any great king

ขอนบคำนับอ้า ไพร่ฟ้า จงเจริญ

Now let me salute with the words, “Long live the people!”





HRW on continuing detentions

21 04 2021

Human Rights WatchHuman Rights Watch has released a statement on the continuing detention of political activists. We reproduce it in full, including with links HRW had embedded:

(New York) – Thai authorities should immediately release pro-democracy activists detained on charges of insulting the monarchy, Human Rights Watch said today. Prominent Thammasat University students Parit Chiwarak and Panusaya Sithijirawattanakul have been on hunger strike to protest their pre-trial detention, for 35 days and 21 days respectively.

The charges against Parit, Panusaya, and others should be dropped for violating their rights to freedom of expression and peaceful assembly. Until then, bail should be provided for all those detained under the lese majeste (insulting the monarchy) law. Hunger strikers should be transferred to a hospital for medical supervision.

“Thai authorities should immediately drop the cases against Parit, Panusaya, and others unjustly charged for their peaceful pro-democracy protests, but at a minimum they should be released on bail,” said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “Holding activists in detention prior to trial and conviction, which could be years away, seems aimed to unfairly punish them rather than fulfill a legitimate state interest.”

On March 8, 2021, the Bangkok Criminal Court ordered Panusaya, Jatupat Boonpattararaksa, and Panupong Jadnok into pre-trial detention on lese majeste charges connected to the speeches they made demanding reforms of the monarchy during a rally on September 19, 2020. The cases follow the court’s February 9 decision to order four other prominent democracy activists – Parit, Arnon Nampha, Somyot Pruksakasemsuk, and Patiwat Saraiyaem – into pre-trial detention on similar charges.

Article 112 of Thailand’s Criminal Code makes lese majeste punishable by up to 15 years in prison. The activists were also charged with sedition under Criminal Code article 116, which carries a maximum 7-year sentence. These cases are just the latest in which Thai activists charged with lese majeste have been detained for lengthy periods that could go on for years until their trial is concluded, Human Rights Watch said.

Except for Patiwat, who gave a statement in court on March 29 that he would no longer participate in rallies and other political activities or make public comments about the monarchy, the court has repeatedly denied the activists’ bail requests, saying they are likely to commit the alleged offenses again if released.

Holding those charged with lese majeste in pretrial detention violates their rights under international human rights law. The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), which Thailand has ratified, encourages bail for criminal suspects. Article 9 states that, “It shall not be the general rule that persons awaiting trial shall be detained in custody, but release may be subject to guarantees to appear for trial.” Those whose charges have not been dropped should be tried without undue delay, Human Rights Watch said.

The number of lese majeste cases in Thailand has significantly increased in the past year, Human Rights Watch said. After almost a three-year hiatus in which lese majeste prosecutions were not brought before the courts, Prime Minister Gen. Prayut Chan-ocha, in November, ordered the authorities to restore lese majeste prosecutions, ostensibly because of growing criticisms of the monarchy. Since then, officials have charged at least 82 people with lese majeste crimes in relation to various activities at pro-democracy rallies or comments on social media.

In a February 8 statement on the situation in Thailand, United Nations human rights experts said that lese majeste laws have “no place in a democratic country.” They also expressed serious concerns about the growing number of lese majeste prosecutions and harsh prison sentences the courts have meted out to some defendants. On January 19, a retired civil servant, Anchan Preelert, received an 87-year prison sentence, later halved after she pleaded guilty.

The ICCPR protects the right to freedom of expression. General Comment 34 of the Human Rights Committee, the international expert body that monitors compliance with the covenant, states that laws such as those for lese majeste “should not provide for more severe penalties solely on the basis of the identity of the person that may have been impugned” and that governments “should not prohibit criticism of institutions.”

“The Thai government should stop this witch hunt against peaceful dissenters and demonstrate respect for human rights by permitting all viewpoints,” Adams said. “The government should engage with United Nations experts and others about amending the lese majeste law to bring it into compliance with Thailand’s international human rights law obligations.”





Penguin to Rung

20 04 2021

In October 2020, Penguin (Parit Chiwarak) wrote a poem for Rung (Panusaya Sithijirawattanakul, whose name means Rainbow). Penguin and Rung were in jail at the time, and both are now in jail again, each on a dangerous hunger strike. Penguin wrote several striking poems from prison, evoking Jit Phumisak, a progressive-cum-communist revolutionary who also wrote at least one poem from prison and who died young, killed by the Army. Ann Norman translated Penguin’s first poem:

ข้อความจากเพนกวิน
A Message from Penguin
Penguin and Rung

Clipped from The Nation

แด่รุ้ง และเพื่อนผู้ต้องขังทางการเมืองทุกคน
To Rung, and all of my political prisoner friends
 
ฟ้าขื่นค่ำคืนหนาว
The sky is bitter, the night is cold
ยะเยือกร้าวกระดูกไข
Shivering to the bone
ลมพัดโหมซัดไอ
A gust of wind blows
ละอองฝน กระเซ็นสาย
mists of raindrops
 
มองเดือนก็เดือนดับ
Watch the moon, it’s a setting moon
มองดาวอับลับแสงพราย
Look at the stars, their sparkling faint and muted
คืนนี้นอนเดียวดาย
This night is so lonesome
ในกรงขัง อันวังเวง
In a lonely cell
 
เงี่ยหูฟังสุ้มเสียง
Lend an ear and hear the sound
หาใช่เสียงดนตรีเพลง
It’s not the music of a song
คือถ้อยร้อยบรรเลง
It’s a string of words making music
แห่งคืนมืดประโคมขาน
in the dark night, proclaiming and calling out
 
ที่ฟาดคือฟ้าร้อง
What beats is thunder
ใช่เสียงกลอง ย่ำโมงกาล
Not the sound of a drum [telling] the evening hour
ที่ดัง แว่วกังวาล
What loudly resounds in the distance
ใช่กระดิ่ง คือโซ่ตรวน
is not a bell but the sound of a chain
 
ที่หวีดมาหวิวหวิว
The whistling sound
ใช่ขลุ่ยผิวหากลมหวน
is not not a flute but the moaning wind
ที่ขับคันธัพครวญ
What calls out [in an ancient musical style] and croons,
คือเสียงเพรียกของผู้คน
It’s the cries of the people
 
เสียงคนผู้จนยาก
The sound of impoverished people
ได้ยินจากทุกแห่งหน
Heard from every place
เพลงเข็ญยังเล่นวน
A song of suffering plays and circulates
ระงมเลื่อนมิเลือนหาย
Loud and tumultuous, not dying out
 
คืนนี้แน่คืนยาก
This night is certainly difficult
ดังใจพรากพลัดจากกาย
As if the mind was separated from the body
ความเป็นคนมลาย
Your humanity melts away
พายุห้ำกระพือโหม
The storm rages
 
เธออาจจะหวาดหวั่น
You may be scared
เมื่อฟ้าลั่นประจัญโจม
When the sky rumbles and rushes in
หากฟ้าที่ถาโถม
If the sky that swoops down
ย่อมวัดมาตรขนาดใจ
is going to measure the size of your heart
 
เหล็กกล้าที่แกร่งดี
Steel that is good and strong
ต้องถูกตีและผ่านไฟ
Must be struck and go through fire
คนกล้ายิ่งกว่าใคร
Bold people more than anyone
ต้องผ่านภัยใจจึงทน
Must pass dangers, the heart therefore endures
 
มีสู้ย่อมมีเจ็บ
Where there is struggle, there is pain
และหนาวเหน็บในบางหน
And shivering sometimes
แต่เพื่อประชาชน
But for the people
จงทนทุกข์อย่างทนทาน
[one] must suffer and bear it
 
เพื่อเกียรติภูมิมั่น
For a reputation/dignity that is secure and certain
จงยิ้มหยันอย่างอาจหาญ
We must boldly give a mocking smile
แสนปืนทั้งหมื่นมาร
A hundred thousand guns, all ten thousands obstacles
ฤ จะสู้เพียงหนึ่งใจ
We fight only with one heart
 
ที่ยืนหยัดในศรัทธา
In standing fast in [one’s] faith
ทนงกล้าบนทางไกล
Bravely enduring on the long path
อำนาจทมิฬใด
no cruel power of any kind
มิอาจข่มให้ก้มหัว
may force [us] to bow [our] heads
 
แม้ฝนกระหน่ำฟ้า
Even though the rain pounds
จงเชิดหน้าอย่าเกรงกลัว
[you] must raise your head, don’t be afraid and cower
ประกาศให้รู้ทั่ว
Let everyone everywhere know
ว่าฟ้าใหม่คืบใกล้มา
That the New Sky is inching closer
 
ถึงวันที่แสงส่อง
Until the day that the rays of light shine
อำไพผ่องทั่วท้องนภา
Bright and beautiful throughout the whole sky
ผองคนบนผืนหล้า
All the people on the land, then
จะลั่นกลองอย่างเกรียงไกร
Will rumble drums, mightily
 
วันนั้นคือวันพรุ่ง
That day is tomorrow
ย่อมเห็นรุ้งอร่ามไกล
We will see A Rainbow glittering far [across the place]
มวลชนจะมีชัย
The masses will have victory
และเป็นใหญ่ในแผ่นดิน
And be most important on the land
 
เพนกวิน พริษฐ์ ชิวารักษ์
Penguin Parit Chiwarak
ผู้ต้องขังทางการเมือง ณ เรือนจำพิเศษกรุงเทพ
Political prisoner at Bangkok Remand Prison
29 ต.ค. 2563
October 29, 2020