Updated: Two bailed

23 04 2021

Two political prisoners charged with lese majeste and other offenses have been granted bail.

Thai PBS reports the good news that Somyos Prueksakasemsuk and Jatuphat Boonpattaraksa have finally been bailed. The softening of the regime and the regime’s courts on these two may reflect a regime belief that it can further split the leadership of the recent protests. In any case, these two, both previously convicted and jailed on 112 charges, have agreed that they will not challenge the monarchy:

Pai and Somyos

Pai and Somyos Clipped from Thai PBS

The defendants told the court that, if they were to be granted bail, they would refrain from any activities which may damage the reputation of the Thai monarchy.

Having heard the testimony of prison officials and the pledge by the defendants, the court ruled that there was no reason not to grant them bail, at 200,000 baht each, and set the conditions that they must not get involved in activities which may tarnish the monarchy or leave Thailand.

Their supporters, who had been staging 112-minute protests against Article 112 “called off the protest and travelled to Bangkok Remand Prison to welcome the Ratsadon leaders upon their release.”

Update: Prachatai reports that two others on 112 charges – named as Phonphimon (Pholpimol) and Phonchai (Pornchai Wimolsupawong) were bailed in Chiang Mai.





Vendor held on 112 charge

9 04 2021

Prachatai reports data from Thai Lawyers for Human Rights who say that “at least 82 people are facing charges under Section 112 since November 2020.” Several face multiple lese majeste charges and a slew of other charges.

One of the most recent cases to become known involves a 22 year-old online vendor from Chiang Mai, identified only as Phonphimon or Pholpimol.  She faces both a 112 charge and a charge made under the Computer Crimes Act. The charges are reportedly related to a Facebook post from October 2020.112

Phonphimon was arrested on 31 March 2021 “by a team of 5 – 6 uniformed and plainclothes police officers who presented an arrest warrant issued by the Chiang Mai Provincial Court…”.

She was taken to Chang Puak Police Station and “held overnight before being taken to court for a temporary detention request.”

On 1 April, she was told that “the charges were filed by Thikhathat Phrommani, who claimed he saw a Facebook post which was an insult to the King.”

The same day, the “Chiang Mai Provincial Court ruled to detain Phonphimon for 12 days, on the grounds that the penalty for the charges is high and that the accused is likely to flee or tamper with evidence.” As the police already had here electronic devices and she had given them access, this is ridiculous claim by the court.

Phonphimon has denied all charges and denies the Facebook profile is hers.

The Court denied bail and she was taken to the Chiang Mai Woman Correctional Institution. She remains in detention.

She is “being held alone with a prison guard in a cell with no window, and that there was no light other than in front of the cell.”